Search Results for "it-enabled-business-change"

IT-Enabled Business Change

IT-Enabled Business Change

Successful Management

  • Author: Sharm Manwani
  • Publisher: BCS, The Chartered Institute
  • ISBN: 1906124450
  • Category: Business & Economics
  • Page: 180
  • View: 2149
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The high-profile failure of major IT-related projects in both public and private sectors underlines the need for stringent change management. As businesses increasingly look to IT to enable that change, this book examines the types of business change processes that involve the use of IT, from the reasons organisations change the way they work, to how that change is managed and implemented. The intended audience includes business and IT executives, managers, professionals and expert users.

Delivering Successful IT-enabled Business Change

Delivering Successful IT-enabled Business Change

  • Author: Great Britain. National Audit Office
  • Publisher: The Stationery Office
  • ISBN: 0102942323
  • Category: Business & Economics
  • Page: 53
  • View: 9188
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The Government set out its strategy to improve the delivery of public services through increased and better use of information technology (Cm. 6683, ISBN 0101668325) in November 2005, with the aim of ensuring services are designed around the needs of customers or citizens rather than the provider. Drawing on 24 case studies from the public and private sectors in the UK and overseas, this NAO report highlights examples of successful IT-enabled programmes and projects which have achieved tangible benefits for citizens and taxpayers and identifies good practice which can be transferred to new and existing government programmes and projects. It pinpoints three key issues in these success stories relating to: i) the degree of engagement by senior decision-makers; ii) the level of organisational understanding of what is needed to be an 'intelligent client' (in terms of having the necessary skills to negotiate effectively with suppliers and users); and iii) the importance of realising the benefits of change by determining at the outset what the desired benefits are and how the project will be managed to ensure these benefits are optimised.

The Handbook of Information Systems Research

The Handbook of Information Systems Research

  • Author: Michael E. Whitman,Amy B. Woszczynski
  • Publisher: IGI Global
  • ISBN: 9781591402282
  • Category: Computers
  • Page: 349
  • View: 5322
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With the quantity and quality of available works in Information Systems (IS) research, it would seem advantageous to possess a concise list of exemplary works on IS research, in order to enable instructors of IS research courses to better prepare students to publish in IS venues. To that end, The Handbook of Information Systems Research provides a collection of works on a variety of topics related to IS research. This book provides a fresh perspective on issues related to IS research by providing chapters from world-renowned leaders in IS research along with chapters from relative newcomers who bring some interesting and often new perspectives to IS research. This book should serve as an excellent text for a graduate course on IS research methods.

Business Process Management

Business Process Management

Profiting from Process

  • Author: Naresh Verma
  • Publisher: Global India Publications
  • ISBN: 9788190794176
  • Category: Business & Economics
  • Page: 311
  • View: 7881
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This book explores at the various component-based integration technologies that are relevant for Business Process management Systems (BPMS).It discusses object-based technologies and discusses the work flow.Management System (WFMS) in detail. Further it elabortes various types of process integration systems,discusses the ideal BPMS,and attempts to elucidate the various standards,competitors to the standards described here, to support BPMS.It also discusses various integration technologies and look into the Business Process Management System (PMS) components and tools based on the previous integration technologies.

The delays in administering the 2005 Single Payment Scheme in England

The delays in administering the 2005 Single Payment Scheme in England

fifty-fifth report of session 2006-07, report, together with formal minutes, oral and written evidence

  • Author: Great Britain: Parliament: House of Commons: Committee of Public Accounts
  • Publisher: The Stationery Office
  • ISBN: 9780215036179
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 65
  • View: 6343
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The EU Single Payment Scheme replaced 11 previous subsidies to farmers based on agricultural production with one payment for land management. The European Commission gave some discretion to Member States over how to implement the scheme, and the Rural Payments Agency, which is responsible for administering the scheme in England, opted for the dynamic hybrid model which incorporates elements of previous entitlement and new regionalised area payments based on a flat rate per hectare. The Agency and Defra encountered severe problems in the implementation of the scheme in England, and by the end of March 2006, it had paid farmers only 15 per cent of the £1,515 million due, compared with its target of 96 per cent. This caused significant hardship to farmers and taxpayers will have to pay extra implementation costs. Defra has had to secure an extra £300 million to meet the potential cost of disallowance of expenditure by the European Commission arising on the problems in administering the scheme. Following on from a NAO report on this topic (HCP 1631, session 2005-06; ISBN 9780102943399 published in October 2006, as well as a report from the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Select Committee (HCP 107-I, session 2006-07, ISBN 9780215033383) published in March 2007, this report by the Public Accounts Committee examines the impact of the payment delays on the farming sector, why implementation failed, the role of Defra and the changes being put in place to rectify the mistakes made. Lessons highlighted include: the Department made the scheme unnecessarily complex by choosing to adopt the most demanding implementation option; the Rural Payments Agency shed too many experienced staff at a key time; implementation of the project started before the scheme specification was finalised; and the IT system was introduced without adequate testing, a failure often seen with government IT projects.

Improving Corporate Functions Using Shared Services

Improving Corporate Functions Using Shared Services

  • Author: Great Britain: National Audit Office
  • Publisher: The Stationery Office
  • ISBN: 9780102951479
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 39
  • View: 1031
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Corporate services provide often vital support to the delivery of effective and efficient public services, and cover such areas as finance and accounting, human resources, procurement, information technology, facilities and estates management. Sir Peter Gershon's review of public sector efficiency (available on the HM Treasury website, http://www.hm-treasury.gov.uk/media/C/A/efficiency_review120704) identified benefits from shared services, but found that departments' efficiency targets did not include savings specifically from shared corporate services. This NAO report has been conducted to take account of developments between the 2004 Spending Review (Cm.6237, ISBN 9780101622728) and the 2007 Comprehensive Spending Review (Cm. 7227, ISBN 0101722729) on shared services and focuses mainly on finance and human resources, which are generally the more developed areas of shared service in the public sector. The publication is divided into four parts, and looks at general and specific areas, including: the potential of shared services in the public sector; the problems of customer satisfaction experienced by the NHS and HM Prison Service with shared services; the variable progress across government; the lack of a clear overview from the Cabinet Office on shared services. The NAO has also set out 9 recommendations, including: public bodies should streamline their corporate service processes in line with best practice; they should also improve how they analyse the performance of their corporate services and whether there are more cost-effective ways to obtain such services; Departments should increase public transparency of corporate service performance.

Child Support Reform

Child Support Reform

Report, Together with Formal Minutes

  • Author: Great Britain: Parliament: House of Commons: Work and Pensions Committee
  • Publisher: The Stationery Office
  • ISBN: 9780215033109
  • Category: Child support
  • Page: 99
  • View: 3509
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The Committee's report examines the Government's proposals to reform the child support system, as set out in the White Paper "A new system of child maintenance" (Cm. 6979, ISBN 9780101697927) published in December 2006, and following on from the report by Sir David Henshaw (Cm. 6894, ISBN 9780101689427) published in July 2006. The Committee welcomes the Government's reform proposals, including the eventual replacement of the Child Support Agency by a new body (Child Maintenance and Enforcement Commission (C-MEC)) in 2008 and the fundamental shift proposed towards maintenance agreements privately agreed between parents. However, concerns are raised over the lack of detail for proper scrutiny of how the new system will work, particularly in relation to the provision of advice and guidance services. The report also highlights a number of inherent contradictions between the principles and practicalities of the proposals, for example how the reforms will impact on child poverty targets in relation to parents on welfare benefits, as well as regarding the transition arrangements for the transfer of existing cases onto the new scheme run by C-MEC. Concerns are also raised that whatever the merit of joint birth registration, tagging this highly sensitive matter onto child maintenance legislation will have wider ramifications for the family law system.

Identity Card Technologies

Identity Card Technologies

Scientific Advice, Risk and Evidence; Sixth Report of Session 2005-06; Report, Together with Formal Minutes, Oral and Written Evidence

  • Author: Great Britain: Parliament: House of Commons: Science and Technology Committee
  • Publisher: The Stationery Office
  • ISBN: 9780215030474
  • Category: Science
  • Page: 196
  • View: 8722
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This report focuses upon the Home Office's identity cards scheme, which uses various technologies including biometrics, information and communication technology (ICT) and smart cards. It explores the ways in which scientific advice, risk and evidence are being managed in relation to technologies that are continually developing. The Home Office has followed good practice by the establishment of advisory committees, the use of Office of Government Commerce (OGC) Gateway Reviews and the development of risk management strategies, along with a policy of gradual implementation. But the Committee has identified weaknesses in the use of scientific advice and evidence. There has been a lack of transparency surrounding the incorporation of scientific advice, the procurement process and the ICT system. Consultations have been limited in scope and their objectives have been unclear. Only some aspects of the scheme such as the biometrics have been determined. The Home Office's decisions demonstrate an inconsistent approach to scientific evidence, and the Committee is concerned that choices regarding biometric technology have preceded trials. With extensive trialling still to take place, the Committee is sceptical about the validity of projected costs. The Committee recommends that the Home Office seeks advice on ICT from senior and experienced professionals and establishes an ICT assurance committee. It is crucial that the Home Office increases clarity and transparency across the programme, not only in problem areas. The programme should also be flexible enough to change should evidence emerge that contradicts existing assumptions.

Assets Recovery Agency

Assets Recovery Agency

fiftieth report of session 2006-07, report, together with formal minutes, oral and written evidence

  • Author: Great Britain: Parliament: House of Commons: Committee of Public Accounts
  • Publisher: The Stationery Office
  • ISBN: 9780215036339
  • Category: Law
  • Page: 51
  • View: 1318
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The Assets Recovery Agency (the Agency) was set up in 2003 to recover assets from criminals using new and unique powers of civil recovery as well as criminal confiscation and taxation. It was also tasked with the training, accreditation and monitoring of financial investigators. The Agency is to be disbanded in 2008. It was set up with insufficient preparatory work. There was no business case setting out the expectations for the Agency, resulting in unachievable delivery aims. It is reliant on cases being referred to it by other authorities, but only 707 cases have been referred from 129 out of 696 potential referral partners. The Agency did not develop effective work processes: it failed to keep a comprehensive database of cases referred to it; it did not invest in a time-recording system to manage and monitor staff time and the cost of cases; and it failed to put in place processes to enable management to monitor the progression of cases effectively. Receivers' fees accounted for almost a quarter of the budget but fixed price contracts were not introduced until April 2006. The Agency's office is in central London, heavily reliant on temporary staff, and with high levels of staff turnover. The Agency had recovered assets amounting to only £23 million by December 2006 against expenditure of £65 million, and it has not met its target of becoming self-financing by 2005-06. Asset recovery has been slow because in most cases the full value of the assets was pursued through the courts rather than seeking settlement for a proportion of the assets. The Agency has not been adequately monitoring the accreditation of trained financial investigators. Of the 4,500 financial investigators trained at almost £700 per place, only 1,400 of those were active in the role by summer 2006.

Ministry of Defence

Ministry of Defence

major projects report 2006, forty-sixth report of session 2006-07, report, together with formal minutes, oral and written evidence

  • Author: Great Britain: Parliament: House of Commons: Committee of Public Accounts
  • Publisher: The Stationery Office
  • ISBN: 9780215036056
  • Category: Technology & Engineering
  • Page: 45
  • View: 1893
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This report from the Committee of Public Accounts provides information on the time, cost and performance of the 20 largest projects of the Ministry of Defence where the main investment decision (known as Main Gate) has been taken. This report follows on from a two volume NAO report published in November 2006 (HCP 23-I/23-II, 06/07 - ISBNs 9780102943740; 9780102943733), into the major projects of the Ministry of Defence. Evidence was taken by the Committee based on the NAO report, covering three main issues: the impact of the cost saving measures identified by the Departmental reviews in 2005-06; the performance of individual projects; the Department's initiatives to improve acquisition performance. The Department undertook a review of the 20 post-Main Gate projects, which reduced costs by £781 million. With £91 million a HM Revenue & Customs rebate, and £242 million the result of better management of commercial and contractual arrangements. But, £448 million of the costs were reclassified as expenditure in other procurement or support budgets or towards corporate management. The re-allocations have, according to the Committee, achieved cost reductions for individual projects, but do not represent a saving for the Department as a whole. Total forecast costs for the approved projects amounts to £27 billion, some 11% over budget. Forecast in-service dates slipped 33 months in-year, and there is a cumulative delay of 433 months for projects over their lives so far. The Department is now placing increased emphasis on through life management of Defence projects, involving the life-cycle management of the projects, services and activities.