Search Results for "last-pagan"

The Last Pagan Emperor

The Last Pagan Emperor

Julian the Apostate and the War against Christianity

  • Author: H. C. Teitler
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN: 0190626526
  • Category: History
  • Page: 224
  • View: 3209
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Flavius Claudius Julianus was the last pagan to sit on the Roman imperial throne (361-363). Born in Constantinople in 331 or 332, Julian was raised as a Christian, but apostatized, and during his short reign tried to revive paganism, which, after the conversion to Christianity of his uncle Constantine the Great early in the fourth century, began losing ground at an accelerating pace. Having become an orphan when he was still very young, Julian was taken care of by his cousin Constantius II, one of Constantine's sons, who permitted him to study rhetoric and philosophy and even made him co-emperor in 355. But the relations between Julian and Constantius were strained from the beginning, and it was only Constantius' sudden death in 361 which prevented an impending civil war. As sole emperor, Julian restored the worship of the traditional gods. He opened pagan temples again, reintroduced animal sacrifices, and propagated paganism through both the spoken and the written word. In his treatise Against the Galilaeans he sharply criticised the religion of the followers of Jesus whom he disparagingly called 'Galilaeans'. He put his words into action, and issued laws which were displeasing to Christians--the most notorious being his School Edict. This provoked the anger of the Christians, who reacted fiercely, and accused Julian of being a persecutor like his predecessors Nero, Decius, and Diocletian. Violent conflicts between pagans and Christians made themselves felt all over the empire. It is disputed whether or not Julian himself was behind such outbursts. Accusations against the Apostate continued to be uttered even after the emperor's early death. In this book, the feasibility of such charges is examined.

The Last Pagan

The Last Pagan

Julian the Apostate and the Death of the Ancient World

  • Author: Adrian Murdoch
  • Publisher: Inner Traditions
  • ISBN: 9781594772269
  • Category: Body, Mind & Spirit
  • Page: 280
  • View: 6783
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A history of Julian, the grandson of Constantine, and his failed attempt to reverse the Christian tide that swept the Roman Empire • Portrays the “Apostate” as a poet-philosopher, arguing that had he survived, Christianity would have been checked in its rise • Details reforms enacted by Julian during his two-year reign that marginalized Christians, effectively limiting their role in the social and political life of the Empire • Shows how after Julian’s death the Church used paganism to represent evil and opposition to God, a tactic whose traces still linger The violent death of the emperor Julian (Flavius Claudius Julianus, AD 332-363) on a Persian battlefield has become synonymous with the death of paganism. Vilified throughout history as the “Apostate,” the young philosopher-warrior was the last and arguably the most potent threat to Christianity. The Last Pagan examines Julian’s journey from an aristocratic Christian childhood to his initiation into pagan cults and his mission to establish paganism as the dominant faith of the Roman world. Julian’s death, only two years into his reign, initiated a culture-wide suppression by the Church of all things it chose to identify as pagan. Only in recent decades, with the weakening of the Church’s influence and the resurgence of paganism, have the effects of that suppression begun to wane. Drawing upon more than 700 pages of Julian’s original writings, Adrian Murdoch shows that had Julian lived longer our history and our present-day culture would likely be very different.

A Chronicle of the Last Pagans

A Chronicle of the Last Pagans

  • Author: Pierre Chuvin
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Religion
  • Page: 188
  • View: 6581
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A Chronicle of the Last Pagans is a history of the triumph of Christianity in the Roman Empire as told from the perspective of the defeated: the adherents of the mysteries, cults, and philosophies that dominated Greco–Roman culture. With a sovereign command of the diverse evidence, Pierre Chuvin portrays the complex spiritual, intellectual, and political lives of professing pagans after Christianity became the state religion. While recreating the unfolding drama of their fate—their gradual loss of power, exclusion from political, military, and civic positions, their assimilation, and finally their persecution—he records a remarkable persistence of pagan religiosity and illustrates the fruitful interaction between Christianity and paganism. The author points to the implications of this late paganism for subsequent developments in the Byzantine Empire and the West. Chuvin's compelling account of an often forgotten world of pagan culture rescues an important aspect of our spiritual heritage and provides new understanding of Late Antiquity.

The Last Pagans of Rome

The Last Pagans of Rome

  • Author: Alan Cameron
  • Publisher: OUP USA
  • ISBN: 019974727X
  • Category: History
  • Page: 878
  • View: 4620
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--Book Jacket.

The Final Pagan Generation

The Final Pagan Generation

  • Author: Edward J. Watts
  • Publisher: Univ of California Press
  • ISBN: 0520959493
  • Category: Religion
  • Page: 344
  • View: 4628
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The Final Pagan Generation recounts the fascinating story of the lives and fortunes of the last Romans born before the Emperor Constantine converted to Christianity. Edward J. Watts traces their experiences of living through the fourth century’s dramatic religious and political changes, when heated confrontations saw the Christian establishment legislate against pagan practices as mobs attacked pagan holy sites and temples. The emperors who issued these laws, the imperial officials charged with implementing them, and the Christian perpetrators of religious violence were almost exclusively young men whose attitudes and actions contrasted markedly with those of the earlier generation, who shared neither their juniors’ interest in creating sharply defined religious identities nor their propensity for violent conflict. Watts examines why the "final pagan generation"—born to the old ways and the old world in which it seemed to everyone that religious practices would continue as they had for the past two thousand years—proved both unable to anticipate the changes that imperially sponsored Christianity produced and unwilling to resist them. A compelling and provocative read, suitable for the general reader as well as students and scholars of the ancient world.

The Last Pagan

The Last Pagan

  • Author: James Westfall Thompson
  • Publisher: Wentworth Press
  • ISBN: 9780469944718
  • Category:
  • Page: 98
  • View: 9511
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This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Society and the Holy in Late Antiquity

Society and the Holy in Late Antiquity

  • Author: Peter Brown
  • Publisher: Univ of California Press
  • ISBN: 9780520068001
  • Category: History
  • Page: 347
  • View: 6930
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And introduction -- Inventory applications of current plans -- Approaches for maintaining inventories -- Alternative plans for maintaining fighter inventories.

Between Pagan and Christian

Between Pagan and Christian

  • Author: Christopher P. Jones
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • ISBN: 0674369513
  • Category: Religion
  • Page: 224
  • View: 4426
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Who and what was pagan depended on the outlook of the observer, as Christopher Jones shows in this fresh and penetrating analysis. Treating paganism as a historical construct rather than a fixed entity, Between Christian and Pagan uncovers the fluid ideas, rituals, and beliefs that Christians and pagans shared in Late Antiquity.

Pagan and Christian

Pagan and Christian

Religious Change in Early Medieval Europe

  • Author: David Petts
  • Publisher: A&C Black
  • ISBN: 1780931662
  • Category: History
  • Page: 144
  • View: 5352
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The conversion to Christianity was a key cultural process that saw the transformation of Europe from classical to medieval world. The growth of the Church has been closely linked with the development of other key institutions, such as the state. It has also been highlighted as a factor in changing attitudes to issues such as the body, time and landscapes. While the study of conversion in the early medieval world has increasingly become a focus for both historians and archaeologists, there has been a lack of engagement with the methodological and theoretical problems underpinning any attempt to explore the archaeology of belief. This book, illustrated with case studies and examples drawn from a range of sources, including the 'Celtic' west, Anglo-Saxon England, Scandinavia and Eastern Europe, tackles some of these important issues. In particular it explores two under-theorised aspects of conversion: the relationship between archaeology and belief, and an attempt to re-centre the 'pagan' as a key element in the conversion process.