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More Birbal Tales

Author : James Allen Moseley
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Birbal is surely one of the best-loved figures in the folklore of India. For generations, the Birbal stories have delighted children and grown-ups alike, from one end of India to the other. Jalaludin Mohammed Akbar Padshah Ghazi, Emperor of India, ruled from 1560 to 1605. Akbar was great in an age of great rulers: Elizabeth I of England, Henry IV of France, Philip II of Spain, Suleiman the Magnificent of Turkey, and Shah Abbas the Great of Persia. Akbar was chivalrous and just to all, but he could be violent and overmastering, if needed. His magnetic personality won the love and affection of his people and the respect and admiration of his enemies. Akbar was superb at riding, polo, and swordsmanship, and he was a crack shot with a musket. He was courageous, often fighting personally in the heat of battle. He was a brilliant general, a master of speed, surprise, and minute details. His lightening conquests of India, from the Hindu Kush to Bengal, were feats of military genius. Akbar worked hard at the trade of king, sleeping only three hours a night. Although he could neither read nor write (he was probably dyslexic), he had legions of scholars who read to him. His son, Prince Sultan Salim, later the Emperor Jahangir, wrote that no one could have guessed that Akbar was illiterate. He loved religion, philosophy, music, architecture, poetry, history, and painting. He forged an Empire that enjoyed long-lasting peace and high cultural refinement. The Empire of the Mughals was vast and fabulously rich. Akbar's lower taxes and rising conquests created prosperity for the people and floods of treasure for the Crown. European visitors estimated that just one province of Akbar's Empire, Bengal, was wealthier than France and England combined. Birbal was born to a poor Brahmin family of Tikawanpur on the banks of the River Jumna. He rose to the exalted level of minister (or "Wazir") at Akbar's court by virtue of his razor-like wit. He was a good poet, writing under the pen-name of "Brahma," and a collection of his verse is preserved today in the Bharatpur Museum. Birbal's duties at court were administrative and military, but his close friendship with the Emperor was sealed by Akbar's love of wisdom and subtle humor. In Birbal the young King found a true sympathizer and companion. When, in an attempt to unify his Hindu and Muslim subjects, Akbar founded a new religion of universal tolerance, the Din-I-Ilahi, or "Divine Faith," there was only one Hindu among the handful of his followers, and that was Birbal. Many courtiers were jealous of Birbal's star-like rise to fortune and power, and, according to popular accounts, they were endlessly plotting his downfall. The character of Akbar in these stories is rather fanciful, and, historically, Birbal is scarcely heard of. Village storytellers probably invented many of these tales over the ages, simply attributing them to Birbal and Akbar because their characters seemed to fit. Akbar's court was mobile, a tradition handed down from his nomadic ancestors, the Mongols of Central Asia. (Mughal is Urdu for Mongol.) The Emperor ruled sometimes from the fortress of Agra, sometimes from the noble city of Lahore. In the period of these tales, 1571 to 1585, Akbar held court in the shimmering pleasure city which he had built for himself - Fatehpur Sikri.

Still More Birbal Tales

Author : James Allen Moseley
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Birbal is surely one of the best-loved figures in the folklore of India. For generations, the Birbal stories have delighted children and grown-ups alike, from one end of India to the other. Jalaludin Mohammed Akbar Padshah Ghazi, Emperor of India, ruled from 1560 to 1605. Akbar was great in an age of great rulers: Elizabeth I of England, Henry IV of France, Philip II of Spain, Suleiman the Magnificent of Turkey, and Shah Abbas the Great of Persia. Akbar was chivalrous and just to all, but he could be violent and overmastering, if needed. His magnetic personality won the love and affection of his people and the respect and admiration of his enemies. Akbar was superb at riding, polo, and swordsmanship, and he was a crack shot with a musket. He was courageous, often fighting personally in the heat of battle. He was a brilliant general, a master of speed, surprise, and minute details. His lightening conquests of India, from the Hindu Kush to Bengal, were feats of military genius. Akbar worked hard at the trade of king, sleeping only three hours a night. Although he could neither read nor write (he was probably dyslexic), he had legions of scholars who read to him. His son, Prince Sultan Salim, later the Emperor Jahangir, wrote that no one could have guessed that Akbar was illiterate. He loved religion, philosophy, music, architecture, poetry, history, and painting. He forged an Empire that enjoyed long-lasting peace and high cultural refinement. The Empire of the Mughals was vast and fabulously rich. Akbar's lower taxes and rising conquests created prosperity for the people and floods of treasure for the Crown. European visitors estimated that just one province of Akbar's Empire, Bengal, was wealthier than France and England combined. Birbal was born to a poor Brahmin family of Tikawanpur on the banks of the River Jumna. He rose to the exalted level of minister (or "Wazir") at Akbar's court by virtue of his razor-like wit. He was a good poet, writing under the pen-name of "Brahma," and a collection of his verse is preserved today in the Bharatpur Museum. Birbal's duties at court were administrative and military, but his close friendship with the Emperor was sealed by Akbar's love of wisdom and subtle humor. In Birbal the young King found a true sympathizer and companion. When, in an attempt to unify his Hindu and Muslim subjects, Akbar founded a new religion of universal tolerance, the Din-I-Ilahi, or "Divine Faith," there was only one Hindu among the handful of his followers, and that was Birbal. Many courtiers were jealous of Birbal's star-like rise to fortune and power, and, according to popular accounts, they were endlessly plotting his downfall. The character of Akbar in these stories is rather fanciful, and, historically, Birbal is scarcely heard of. Village storytellers probably invented many of these tales over the ages, simply attributing them to Birbal and Akbar because their characters seemed to fit. Akbar's court was mobile, a tradition handed down from his nomadic ancestors, the Mongols of Central Asia. (Mughal is Urdu for Mongol.) The Emperor ruled sometimes from the fortress of Agra, sometimes from the noble city of Lahore. In the period of these tales, 1571 to 1585, Akbar held court in the shimmering pleasure city which he had built for himself - Fatehpur Sikri.

More Tales of Birbal Akbar

Author : Sanjana Singh
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More Akbar Birbal Stories

Author : Monisha Mukundan
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Ten lively stories about Emperor Akbar and his favourite courtier Birbal, that will delight every child. In the folk tradition of Akbar-Birbal stories, Birbal is known for his wit and wisdom. Both qualities are brought vividly in the exchanges between the great Mughal monarch and his irreverent and wise friend. Tapas Guha’s charming illustrations capture the humour of the stories and bring alive the medieval city of Fatehpur Sikri where Akbar and Birbal actually lived.

MORE AKBAR BIRBAL BPI

Author : BPI
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Illustrated Stories for Children' is a series of storybooks containing all time favourite stories for children to read and enjoy. Each book consists of stories that fuel children's imagination and take them to places where they come across diverse characters. The stories are laden with elements such as adventure, thrill, love, remorse, courage, inspiration, morals, wit, wisdom and magic that blend perfectly to make reading a worthwhile experience. Besides developing reading habits, children will be enthralled and entertained with these delightful books. The stories have been attractively illustrated with pictures that keep children engaged.

TALES OF AKBAR BIRBAL PB

Author : BPI
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TALES OF AKBAR BIRBAL (PB)

Tales of Birbal and Akbar

Author :
File Size : 66.96 MB
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More Tales for Trainers

Author : Margaret Parkin
File Size : 63.95 MB
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In More Tales for Trainers, Margaret Parkin presents a further 50 stories, anecdotes, metaphors and poetry, which any trainer or manager can readily use to encourage and engage learners. Beginning by setting the use of stories in learning on a sound theoretical footing, the book goes on to include sample stories that trainers can use to address a number of learning and development needs. The stories cover all the key areas in organizational training, including: leadership, communication and change.

Akbar Birbal

Author : Prafull Achari
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Abu'l-Fath Jalal-ud-din Muhammad Akbar, popularly known as Akbar I, also as Akbar the Great, was the third Mughal emperor, who reigned from 1556 to 1605. Akbar succeeded his father, Humayun, under a regent, Bairam Khan, who helped the young emperor expand and consolidate Mughal domains in India.Birbal; born Mahesh Das; (1528-1586), or Raja Birbal, was a Hindu Brahmin advisor and main commander (mukhya senapati) of army in the court of the Mughal emperor, Akbar. He is mostly known in the Indian subcontinent for the folk tales which focus on his wit. Birbal was appointed by Akbar as a minister "mantri" and used to be a poet and singer in around 1556-1562. He had a close association with Emperor Akbar and was one of his most important courtiers, part of a group called the navaratnas (nine jewels of Akbar). In 1586, Birbal led an army to crush an unrest in the north-west Indian subcontinent where he was killed along with many troops in an ambush by the rebel tribe. He was the only Hindu to adopt Din-i Ilahi, the religion founded by Akbar.By the end of Akbar's reign, local folk tales emerged involving his interactions with Akbar, portraying him as being extremely clever and witty. As the tales gained popularity in India, he became even more of a legendary figure across the Indian subcontinent. These tales involve him outsmarting rival courtiers and sometimes even Akbar, using only his intelligence and cunning, often with giving witty and humorous responses and impressing Akbar. From the twentieth century onwards, plays, films and books based on these folk tales were made, some of these are in children's comics and school textbooks.The stories of Akbar and Birbal have been read and heard since childhood, which can be judged by the wisdom and wisdom of Birbal, these stories are very interesting and they are very knowledgeable, inspiring, and more qualified. Through this book, it will be our endeavor to make available the famous stories of Akbar-Birbal in one place so that they can easily be read and some can be learned from them.

A Caravan from Hindustan

Author : James Moseley
File Size : 64.23 MB
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For five centuries, Birbal has been one of the best-loved figures in the folklore of India. Polished like gemstones in the river of time, The Birbal Tales wit and insight have delighted children and grownups from Kerala to Kashmir. Now the complete collection comes to the West, after years of loving research and creative, and historically accurate, restoration. Moseleys Birbal Tales have won The National Writers Club First Prize for Fiction and the University of Southern Louisianas First Prize for Juvenile Fiction. This timeless classic is a wonderful gift for children and a treasury of humor and wisdom for adults. Testimonials Absolutely beautiful. I can see why you have a devoted following. - Duval Y. Hecht, President, BOOKS ON TAPE, INC. I have read Moseley's Birbal Tales and must say I was utterly enchanted. The stories are beautifully retold in a style that is not only charming in English but could have come straight from a collection of Persian tales at the Mughal court. Moseley has certainly captured the fantasy court world in which stories of this type are usually cast. He continues in the finest tradition of the Mughal qissagu (storyteller). I trust he will offer more volumes in this collection to the undoubted delight of his readers. - Wheeler M. Thackston, Professor of the Practice in Persian and Other Near Eastern Languages, HARVARD UNIVERSITY Delightful! - Swapna Vora, Editor, INDIAN EXPRESS, North American Edition At a time when thousands of intellectuals and professionals are migrating from India to the USA in search of wealth, Moseley has traveled to India to collect priceless gems from her immortal tradition and folk wisdom. Devoid of any high-sounding Brahmanic dogma, these tales have entertained and taught people of all levels for hundreds of years. Rendered again in the most lucid style, reading these tales is like reliving one's childhood. The book will fill the void for Indians now living in Diaspora and will give a new dimension of India to its Western readers. - Ved Prakash Vatuk, D. Litt, Director FOLKLORE INSTITUTE, Berkeley & Former Professor of Folklore, UC Berkeley It is so rare to have a book that will charm children, please adult readers, satisfy curiosity about foreign folk tales, and inform any reader regarding a different culture. But here is a book that does it all. - Ted Maas, ALLIANCE HOUSE, INC. James Moseleys collection of Birbal Tales capture the wit and wisdom of the famous Indian courtier while maintaining the simple poetry of those told orally for generations across India. - Maryann Mahajan, INDIA POST.COM Moseleysprose evokes the magical world of Akbars courtin witty, charming stories, which are still popular with children in India. Historical notes are appended. - BOOKLIST There are so many wonderful books for very young children, but there is too little good literature for middlings from age seven to eleven. This book, which adults can enjoy as well as children, brings praises from a Harvard Professor to a Hollywood Producer. Interestingly, although the tales are indeed charming and amusing, they are not fictional, but true stories of a wise man who really lived in long ago India in the palace of the Emperor Akbar. Birbal served his Emperor with wit and wisdom, and he became so renowned that even today parents and grandparents use these clever adventures as morality tales. - IndoLink.com This book is very promising. - Vandana Kumar, Editor, INDIA CURRENTS MAGAZINE, California Traveling throughout India for many years, the author collected many tales from the oral tradition surrounding the 14th-century Great Mughal Emperor, Akbar, and his wise advisor, the commoner Birbal. These short sto

AKBAR BIRBAL STORIES PB

Author : BPI
File Size : 61.64 MB
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AKBAR BIRBAL STORIES (PB)

Birbal Stories 32 pp

Author : Neela Subramaniam
File Size : 26.32 MB
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Akbar and Birbal

Author : JaiyKrishna Vijayaalayan
File Size : 22.33 MB
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The Akbar Birbal stories are one of the most popular short and funny stories across the globe. These short stories have been translated into various other languages like Hindi, Tamil, Telugu, and many more. These stories were based on The Mughalaya kingdom of India which was ruled by Emperor Akbar from 1542 to 1605 AD.Birbal served as a minister during Akbar's period. Birbal's exceptional wisdom and his clever tricks were praised by the king and commoner.This book contains Twenty Short stories of Akbar and Birbal. It is written in simple English with colourful illustrations.

Akbar and Birbal Stories

Author : Jayaseelan Samuel
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Akbar & Birbal Stories are exceptionally acclaimed and famous in India among all periods of individuals. There was a Mogul Emperor in India, Akbar The Great (1542-1605). His full name was Jalaludden Mohammed Akbar Padshah Ghazi and he controlled India from 1560 to 1605. He himself was ignorant, yet he welcomed a few educated individuals in his court. Among these individuals, nine were exceptionally renowned and were called Nav Ratna (nine gems of the Mogul Crown) of his court. Among these nine gems, five individuals were more well known - Tansen, Todarmal, Abul Fazal, Maan Singh and Birbal.

Stories of Akbar Birbal

Author : BPI
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Stories of Akbar Birbal

Akbar and Birbal

Author : Amita Vohra Sarin
File Size : 54.29 MB
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Stories and legends of a king and his wise friend.

Children s Books on India

Author : Sharada Nayak
File Size : 34.29 MB
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Parents and Children

Author :
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Stories of Krishna

Author : Anant Pai
File Size : 75.24 MB
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Includes the following titles: Krishna Krishna and Rukmini The Syamantaka Gem Krishna and Jarasandha Krishna and Narakasura

Akbar and Birbal Stories

Author : Roshan Jha
File Size : 48.76 MB
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Akbar was one of the last rulers in India who ruled well over a large portion of India. It is said that he had 9 living gems in his court. Out of these 9 gems, two are the most well-known.Tansen, who is said to be one of the greatest singers ever to have lived, was one of these 9 living gems of Akbar's court.And the other one was the great Birbal. It is said that Birbal was among the smartest men in the kingdom of Akbar. He was wise and knew how to reply to any kind of question or to handle any difficult question. Soon, stories began to spread about the wisdom of Birbal. Many of these stories are often attributed to other wise legends like the great Tenali Raman or to Gonu Jha. How many of these stories are true and actually happened with Birbal or with Tenali or Gonu Jha? We don't know. Did any of these stories actually happen at all? We cannot be sure.But there is one thing that we can be sure of. These stories are interesting and entertain us. So, let's dive into these stories. Hope you enjoy them.