Search results for: my-revision-notes-aqa-as-a-level-history-the-making-of-modern-britain-1951-2007

My Revision Notes Aqa As A Level History The Making of Modern Britain 1951 2007

Author : Peter Clements
File Size : 88.66 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
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Exam Board: AQA Level: AS/A-level Subject: History First Teaching: September 2015 First Exam: June 2016 Target success in AQA AS/A-level History with this proven formula for effective, structured revision; key content coverage is combined with exam preparation activities and exam-style questions to create a revision guide that students can rely on to review, strengthen and test their knowledge. - Enables students to plan and manage a successful revision programme using the topic-by-topic planner - Consolidates knowledge with clear and focused content coverage, organised into easy-to-revise chunks - Encourages active revision by closely combining historical content with related activities - Helps students build, practise and enhance their exam skills as they progress through activities set at three different levels - Improves exam technique through exam-style questions with sample answers and commentary from expert authors and teachers - Boosts historical knowledge with a useful glossary and timeline

Making of Modern Britain 1951 2007

Author : J. M. A. Hugh
File Size : 40.85 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
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The Making of Modern Britain Revision Guide is part of the bestselling Oxford AQA History for A Level series. With step-by-step exam practice strategies and Examiner Tip features for all AQA question types, this revision guide offers the clear revision approach of Recap, Apply, and Review to prepare students for exam success.

Oxford AQA History A Level and AS Component 2 The Making of Modern Britain 1951 2007

Author : Sally Waller
File Size : 73.45 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
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Retaining all the well-loved features from the previous editions, The Making of Modern Britain has been approved by AQA and matched to the 2015 specification. With a strong focus on skills building and exam practice, this book explores in depth the key political, economic, social and international changes which helped to mould Britain in the second half of the twentieth century. It focuses on key concepts such as government and opposition, class and cultural change, and covers events and developments with precision. Students can further develop vital skills such as historical interpretations and source analyses via specially selected sources and extracts. Practice questions and study tips provide additional support to help familiarize students with the new exam style questions, and help them achieve their best in the exam.

Making Identity Count

Author : Ted Hopf
File Size : 84.56 MB
Format : PDF
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Constructivism, despite being one of the three main streams of IR theory, along with realism and liberalism, is rarely, if ever, tested in large-n quantitative work. Constructivists almost unanimously eschew quantitative approaches, assuming that variables of interest to constructivists, defy quantification. Quantitative scholars mostly ignore constructivist variables as too fuzzy and vague. And the rare instances in which quantitative scholars have operationalized identity as a variable, they have unfortunately realized all the constructivists' worst fears about reducing national identity to a single measure, such as language, religion, or ethnicity, thereby violating one of the foundational assumptions of constructivism: intersubjectivity. Making Identity Count presents a new method for the recovery of national identity, applies the method in 9 country cases, and draws conclusions from the empirical evidence for hegemonic transitions and a variety of quantitative theories of identity. Ted Hopf and Bentley B. Allan make the constructivist variable of national identity a valid measure that can be used by large-n International Relations scholars in a variety of ways. They lay out what is wrong with how identity has been conceptualized, operationalized and measured in quantitative IR so far and specify a methodological approach that allows scholars to recover the predominant national identities of states in a more valid and systematic fashion. The book includes "national identity reports" on China, the US, UK, Germany, France, Brazil, Japan, and India to both test the authors' method and demonstrate the promise of the approach. Hopf and Allan use these data to test a constructivist hypothesis about the future of Western neoliberal democratic hegemony. Finally, the book concludes with an assessment of the method, including areas of possible improvement, as well as a description of what an intersubjective national identity data base of great powers from 1810-2010 could mean for IR scholarship.