Search results for: napoleons-invasion-of-russia

1812 Napoleon s Invasion of Russia

Author : Paul Britten Austin
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This volume brings together Austin's atmospheric trilogy on Napoleon's Russian campaign, allowing the reader to trace the course of Napoleon's doomed soldiers from the crossing of the Niemen in 1812 to the finale in the depths of a Russian winter.

Napoleon s Invasion of Russia

Author : Hereford Brooke George
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Drawn from innumerable sources, this book provides a concise history of the reasons for, the campaigns, and the conclusion of Napoleon's ill-fated attempt to conquer Russia. Unlike other accounts, this book offers a more accessible version of events and separates fact from fiction to provide an insight into Napoleon's motives and reasons for his eventual failure.

Napoleon s Invasion of Russia

Author : George Nafziger
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“An impressive source book on the conflict, high on information and data.”—Journal of the Society for Army Historical Research September 7, 1812, is by itself one of the most cataclysmic days in the history of war: 74,000 casualties at the Battle of Borodino. And this was well before the invention of weaspons of mass destruction like machine guns or breech-loading rifles. In this detailed study of one of the most fascinating military campaigns in history, George Nazfiger includes a clear exposition on the power structure in Europe at the time leading up to Napoleon’s fateful decision to attempt what turned out to be impossible: the conquest of Russia. Also featured are complete orders of battle and detailed descriptions of the opposing forces.

Napoleon s Invasion of Russia 1812

Author : Eugene Tarlé
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Napoleon Bonaparte (1769-1821) is one of the most illustrated political and military figures of the last two millennia. He has remained in the memory of the world as a legend that the passage of the years has failed to blur. On the contrary, Napoleon Bonaparte widely continues to be considered the personification of human genius. Originally published in this English translation in 1942, leading Russian historian Evgeny Tarle details Napoleon’s military campaign to invade Russia in the early nineteenth century. “The campaign of 1812 was more frankly imperialistic than any other of Napoleon’s wars; it was more directly dictated by the interests of the French upper middle class. The war of 1796-7, the conquest of Egypt in 1798-9, the second Italian campaign, and the recent defeat of the Austrians could still be justified as necessary measures of defence against the interventionists. The Napoleonic press called the Austerlitz campaign ‘self-defence’ against Russia, Austria, and England. The average Frenchman considered even the subjugation of Prussia in 1806-7 no more than a just penalty inflicted on the Prussian court for the arrogant ultimatum sent by Frederick-William III to the ‘peace-loving’ Napoleon, constantly harried by troublesome neighbours. Napoleon never ceased to speak of the fourth conquest of Austria in 1809 as a ‘defensive’ war, provoked by Austrian threats. Only the invasion of Spain and Portugal was passed over in discreet silence. “The War of 1812 was a struggle for survival in the full sense of the word—a defensive struggle against the onslaughts of the imperialist vulture.”—E. V. Tarle

Napoleon s Invasion of Russia

Author : Charles River Charles River Editors
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*Includes pictures *Includes accounts of the campaign written by French soldiers *Includes a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents "The thunderstorms of the 24th turned into other downpours, turning the tracks--some diarists claim there were no roads in Lithuania--into bottomless mires. Wagon sank up to their hubs; horses dropped from exhaustion; men lost their boots. Stalled wagons became obstacles that forced men around them and stopped supply wagons and artillery columns. Then came the sun which would bake the deep ruts into canyons of concrete, where horses would break their legs and wagons their wheels." - Richard K. Riehn French emperor Napoleon Bonaparte was not a man made for peacetime. By 1812, he had succeeded in subduing most of his enemies - though in Spain, the British continued to be a perpetual thorn in his flank that drained the Empire of money and troops - but his relationship with Russia, never more than one of mutual suspicion at best, had now grown downright hostile. At the heart of it, aside from the obvious mistrust that two huge superpowers intent on dividing up Europe felt for one another, was Napoleon's Continental blockade. Russia had initially agreed to uphold the blockade in the Treaty of Tilsit, but they had since taken to ignoring it altogether. Napoleon wanted an excuse to teach Russia a lesson, and in early 1812 his spies gave him just that: a preliminary plan for the invasion and annexation of Poland, then under French control. Napoleon wasted no time attempting to defuse the situation. He increased his Grande Armee to 450,000 fighting men and prepared it for invasion. On July 23rd, 1812, he launched his army across the border, despite the protestations of many of his Marshals. The Russian Campaign had begun, and it would turn out to be Napoleon's biggest blunder. Russia's great strategic depth already had a habit of swallowing armies, a fact many would-be conquerors learned the hard way. Napoleon, exceptional though he was in so many regards, proved that even military genius can do little in the face of the Russian winter and the resilience of its people. From a purely military standpoint, much of the campaign seemed to be going in Napoleon's favor since he met with little opposition as he pushed forwards into the interior with his customary lightning speed, but gradually this lack of engagements became a hindrance more than a help; Napoleon needed to bring the Russians to battle if he was to defeat them. Moreover, the deeper Napoleon got his army sucked into Russia, the more vulnerable their lines of supply, now stretched almost to breaking point, became. The Grande Armee required a prodigious amount of material in order to keep from breaking down, but the army's pace risked outstripping its baggage train, which was constantly being raided by Cossack marauders. Moreover, Napoleon's customary practice of subsisting partially off the land was proving to be ineffective: the Russians were putting everything along his line of advance, including whole cities, to the torch rather than offer him even a stick of kindling or sack of flour for his army. Napoleon was sure that taking Moscow would prompt the Russians to surrender. Instead, with winter on the way, the Russians appeared more bellicose than ever. Napoleon and his army lingered for several weeks in the burnt shell of Moscow but then, bereft of supplies and facing the very real threat of utter annihilation, Napoleon gave the order to retreat. By the time the Grande Armee had reached the Berezina, it had been decimated: of the over 450,000 fighting men that had invaded Russia that autumn, less than 40,000 remained. Napoleon's Invasion of Russia details the background leading up to the campaign, the fighting, and the aftermath of France's catastrophic defeat. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about the French invasion of Russia like never before.

Napoleon s Invasion of Russia 1812

Author : Евгений Викторович Тарле
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Napoleon s Invasion of Russia 1812 by Eugene Tarle

Author : Eugene Tarle
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Napoleon s Invasion of Russi

Author : R. G. Burton
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The beginning of the end of the Napoleonic Age This is a work of military analysis written by a well known historian of his time. Burton had a fascination for both the spectacular magnitude of the Russian invasion and the magnificent hubris of the man who conceived and drove it onwards to destruction. Nevertheless, he has given a considered view of the events of his subject to his readers and whilst all such academic evaluations are subjective, he has taken great care in preparation of his conclusions to refer to Russian sources including Bogdanovich's history of the war and French sources including Segur, Fezensac and many others. Perhaps, most significantly in preparation for this work, Burton traversed the route of the French Grand Army in its march to Moscow so that he could appreciate its challenges at first hand. This is a valuable evaluation of a famous Napoleonic Campaign. Available in soft cover and hard cover with dust jacket for collectors.

Narrative of Events During the Invasion of Russia by Napoleon Bonaparte

Author : Robert Thomas Wilson
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Published in 1860, this vivid first-hand account provides important insight into Napoleon's ignominious retreat from Russia.

Eighteen Hundred and Twelve Or Napoleon s Invasion of Russia

Author : Ludwig Rellstab
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The Polish Lancer Or 1812 a Tale of Napoleon s Invasion of Russia

Author : Heinrich Friedrich Ludwig RELLSTAB
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The French Invasion of Russia and the Battle of Leipzig

Author : Charles River Charles River Editors
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*Includes pictures *Includes accounts of the fighting written by soldiers and generals *Includes a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents French emperor Napoleon Bonaparte was not a man made for peacetime. By 1812, he had succeeded in subduing most of his enemies - though in Spain, the British continued to be a perpetual thorn in his flank that drained the Empire of money and troops - but his relationship with Russia, never more than one of mutual suspicion at best, had now grown downright hostile. At the heart of it, aside from the obvious mistrust that two huge superpowers intent on dividing up Europe felt for one another, was Napoleon's Continental blockade. Russia had initially agreed to uphold the blockade in the Treaty of Tilsit, but they had since taken to ignoring it altogether. Napoleon wanted an excuse to teach Russia a lesson, and in early 1812 his spies gave him just that: a preliminary plan for the invasion and annexation of Poland, then under French control. Napoleon wasted no time attempting to defuse the situation. He increased his Grande Armee to 450,000 fighting men and prepared it for invasion. On July 23rd, 1812, he launched his army across the border, despite the protestations of many of his Marshals. The Russian Campaign had begun, and it would turn out to be Napoleon's biggest blunder. Russia's great strategic depth already had a habit of swallowing armies, a fact many would-be conquerors learned the hard way. Napoleon, exceptional though he was in so many regards, proved that even military genius can do little in the face of the Russian winter and the resilience of its people. Napoleon's Russian adventure gutted his veteran army, depriving him of the majority of his finest and most loyal soldiers. Those who remained formed the hard core of his new armies, but the Russian fiasco damaged their health and embittered their previously unquestioning loyalty. Napoleon raised vast new armies, but circumstances compelled him to fill the ranks with raw recruits, whose fighting skills did not equal their undoubted bravery and whose dedication to the Napoleonic cause was shaky, and in many cases due solely to coercion. The tough, experienced, faithful veteran found himself outnumbered by unwilling, sketchily trained amateurs. These factors set the stage for the second setback, which essentially sealed the fate of Napoleon's empire. The four-day Battle of Leipzig in October 1813, romantically but accurately dubbed the "Battle of the Nations," proved the decisive encounter of the War of the Sixth Coalition and essentially determined the course the Napoleonic Wars took from that moment forward. All the belligerents showed awareness that the European conflict's climax was at hand: "There was keen determination in Prussia to exact revenge for the humiliation visited by Napoleon, but enthusiasm for armed struggle that would bring the eviction of the French found enthusiastic response throughout the German states. [...] To minimize his army's exposure and purchase time to rebuild, Napoleon might have stood on the defensive, but he followed his standard strategy of deciding the campaign with a bold advance to achieve decisive victory in one stroke." (Tucker, 2011, 302). The resultant collision was the single largest field action of the Napoleonic Wars, dwarfing Waterloo in size, complexity, and overall importance. The Battle of Leipzig was probably the combat which involved the highest concentration of men on a single extended battlefield on the planet up to that point in history, and would not be exceeded until the vast struggles of the First World War almost precisely a century later. The French Invasion of Russia and the Battle of Leipzig details the background leading up to the campaign, the fighting, and the aftermath of France's catastrophic defeat. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about the Battle of Leipzig like never before.

Narrative of Events During the Invasion of Russia by Napoleon Bonaparte and the Retreat of the French Army 1812

Author : Sir Robert Wilson
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Napoleon s Invasion of Russia

Author : Theodore Ayrault Dodge
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A great historian examines Napoleon's failed invasion of Russia in 1812. This classic includes the following chapters: I. The Invasion of Russia (1811 to June, 1812) II. Smolensk and Valutino (August, 1812) III. Borodino (September 1-7, 1812) IV. Moscow (Sep 8 to Oct 19, 1812) V. Maloyaroslavez (Oct 19 to Nov 14, 1812) VI. The Beresina (Nov 15, 1812, to Jan 31, 1813)

Napoleon s Invasion of Russia

Author : Reginald George Burton
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Russia 1812

Author : Curtis Cate
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Napoleon’s calamitous invasion of Russia is legendary. Curtis Cate shows how the two emperors, Napoleon and Tsar Alexander I, led their nations to a momentous confrontation fed by their pride, suspicion, vanity, and stubbornness.

Napoleon

Author : Munro Price
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The dramatic story of Napoleon's overthrow - focusing not on the battle of Waterloo, whose importance has been overestimated, but on the two years before, from the retreat from Moscow to his first abdication in 1814. This period has been much less studied, but saw Napoleon lose both his European empire and the throne of France. Compared to this, his brief return to France in 1815, ending at Waterloo, was merely an epilogue. The mostremarkable aspect of this story is that at several key moments Napoleon's enemies offered him compromise peace terms which would have maintained him on the French throne. The book uses important new material to explore these and the reasons for their failure, shedding fascinating new light on a crucialperiod in modern history.

The Battle of Borodino

Author : Alexander Mikaberidze
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On 7 September 1812 at Borodino, 75 miles west of Moscow, the armies of the Russian and French empires clashed in one of the climactic battles of the Napoleonic Wars. This horrific - and controversial - contest has fascinated historians ever since. The survival of the Russian army after Borodino was a key factor in Napoleon's eventual defeat and the utter destruction of the French army of 1812. In this thought-provoking new study, Napoleonic historian Alexander Mikaberidze reconsiders the 1812 campaign and retells the terrible story of the Borodino battle as it was seen from the Russian point of view. His original and painstakingly researched investigation of this critical episode in Napoleon's invasion of Russia provides the reader with a fresh perspective on the battle and a broader understanding of the underlying reasons for the eventual Russian triumph.

Napol on Bonaparte

Author : Joshua Meeks
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Napoléon Bonaparte: A Reference Guide to His Life and Works cover all aspects of his life and work, from his birth in Corsica to his death in St. Helena. Includes a detailed chronology of Napoléon Bonaparte’s life, family, and work. The A to Z section includes the major events, places, and people in Napoleon’s life. Appendixes listing Napoleon’s marshals, his family, a selection of the most important battles, and a selection of the most significant treaties or documents. The bibliography includes a list of publications concerning his life and works. The index thoroughly cross-references the chronological and encyclopedic entries.

Napoleon Against Russia

Author : Digby Smith
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In June 1812 500,000 men of Napoleon's army invaded Russia. Six months later barely 20,000 returned. The disastrous advance to Moscow and the subsequent retreat irreparably damaged Napoleon's military power and prestige and resulted one of the most celebrated catastrophes of in all military history. Digby Smith's new account of the grim events of 1812 is based on the diaries and letters of soldiers who survived, many of which have not been published in English before. They describe the deadly effect of Napoleon's faulty decisions on the lives of his men, to say nothing of the innumerable Russian military and civilian casualties his campaign caused.