Search results for: nashville-gateway-to-the-south

Nashville the Gateway of the South

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Nashville

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Civil Rights in the Gateway to the South

Author : Tracy E. K'Meyer
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A noted civil rights historian examines Louisville as a cultural border city where the black freedom struggle combined northern and southern tactics. Situated on the banks of the Ohio River, Louisville, Kentucky, represents a cultural and geographical intersection of North and South. This border identity has shaped the city’s race relations throughout its history. Louisville's black citizens did not face entrenched restrictions against voting and civic engagement, yet the city still bore the marks of Jim Crow segregation in public accommodations. In response to Louisville's unique blend of racial problems, activists employed northern models of voter mobilization and lobbying, as well as methods of civil disobedience usually seen in the South. They also crossed traditional barriers between the movements for racial and economic justice to unite in common action. In Civil Rights in the Gateway to the South, Tracy E. K'Meyer provides a groundbreaking analysis of Louisville's uniquely hybrid approach to the civil rights movement. Defining a border as a space where historical patterns and social concerns overlap, K'Meyer argues that broad coalitions of Louisvillians waged long-term, interconnected battles for social justice. “The definitive book on the city’s civil rights history.” —Louisville Courier-Journal

Shelby Avenue Demonbreun St Corridor from I 65 North to I 40 West in Downtown Nashville Davidson County

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The Nashville Way

Author : Benjamin Houston
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Among Nashville's many slogans, the one that best reflects its emphasis on manners and decorum is the Nashville Way, a phrase coined by boosters to tout what they viewed as the city's amicable race relations. Benjamin Houston offers the first scholarly book on the history of civil rights in Nashville, providing new insights and critiques of this moderate progressivism for which the city has long been credited. Civil rights leaders such as John Lewis, James Bevel, Diane Nash, and James Lawson who came into their own in Nashville were devoted to nonviolent direct action, or what Houston calls the “black Nashville Way.” Through the dramatic story of Nashville's 1960 lunch counter sit-ins, Houston shows how these activists used nonviolence to disrupt the coercive script of day-to-day race relations. Nonviolence brought the threat of its opposite—white violence—into stark contrast, revealing that the Nashville Way was actually built on a complex relationship between etiquette and brute force. Houston goes on to detail how racial etiquette forged in the era of Jim Crow was updated in the civil rights era. Combined with this updated racial etiquette, deeper structural forces of politics and urban renewal dictate racial realities to this day. In The Nashville Way, Houston shows that white power was surprisingly adaptable. But the black Nashville Way also proved resilient as it was embraced by thousands of activists who continued to fight battles over schools, highway construction, and economic justice even after most Americans shifted their focus to southern hotspots like Birmingham and Memphis.

The African american History of Nashville Tn 1780 1930 p

Author : Bobby L. Lovett
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Intro -- Contents -- Preface -- 1. Black Nashville during Slavery Times -- 2. Religion, Education, and the Politics of Slavery and Secession -- 3. The Civil War: "Blue Man's Coming -- 4. Life after Slavery: Progress Despite Poverty and Discrimination -- 5. Business and Culture: A World of Their Own -- 6. On Common Ground: Reading, "Riting," and Arithmetic -- 7. Uplifting the Race: Higher Education -- 8. Churches and Religion: From Paternalism to Maturity -- 9. Politics and Civil Rights: The Black Republicans -- 10. Racial Accommodationism and Protest -- Notes -- Index

Tennessee Historical Quarterly

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Nashville

Author : Scott Faragher
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From the 1890s through the 1920s, the postcard was an extraordinarily popular means of communication, and many of the postcards produced during this "golden age" can today be considered works of art. Postcard photographers traveled the length and breadth of the nation snapping photographs of busy street scenes, documenting local landmarks, and assembling crowds of local children only too happy to pose for a picture. These images, printed as postcards and sold in general stores across the country, survive as telling reminders of an important era in America's history. This fascinating new history of Nashville, Tennessee, showcases more than two hundred of the best vintage postcards available.

The National Register of Historic Places

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The Social Origins of the Urban South

Author : Louis M. Kyriakoudes
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In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, millions of black and white southerners left farms and rural towns to try their fate in the region's cities. This transition brought about significant economic, social, and cultural changes in both urban centers and the countryside. Focusing on Nashville and its Middle Tennessee hinterland, Louis Kyriakoudes explores the impetus for this migration and illuminates its effects on regional development. Kyriakoudes argues that increased rural-to-urban migration in the late nineteenth century grew out of older seasonal and circular migration patterns long employed by southern farm families. These mobility patterns grew more urban-oriented and more permanent as rural blacks and whites turned increasingly to urban migration in order to cope with rapid economic and social change. The urban economy was particularly welcoming to women, offering freedom from the male authority that dominated rural life. African Americans did not find the same freedoms, however, as whites found ways to harness the forces of modernization to deny them access to economic and social opportunity. By linking urbanization, economic and social change, and popular cultural institutions, Kyriakoudes lends insight into the development of an urban, white, working-class identity that reinforced racial divisions and laid the demographic and social foundations for today's modern, urban South.

Beyond the Gateway

Author : Susan F. Martin
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A small but growing number of immigrants today are moving into new settlement areas, such as Winchester, Va., Greensboro, N.C., and Salt Lake City, Utah, that lack a tradition of accepting newcomers. Just as the process is difficult and distressing for the immigrants, it is likewise a significant cause of stress for the regions in which they settle. Long homogeneous communities experience overnight changes in their populations and in the demands placed on schools, housing, law enforcement, social services, and other aspects of infrastructure. Institutions have not been well prepared to cope. Local governments have not had any significant experience with newcomers and nongovernmental organizations have been overburdened or simply nonexistent. There has been a substantial amount of discussion about these new settlement areas during the past decade, but relatively little systematic examination of the effects of immigration or the policy and programmatic responses to it. New Immigrant Communities is the first effort to bridge the gaps in communication not only between the immigrants and the institutions with which they interact, but also among diverse communities across the United States dealing with the same stresses but ignorant of each others' responses, whether successes or failures.

Contesting the New South Order

Author : Clifford M. Kuhn
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In May 1914, workers walked off their jobs at Atlanta's Fulton Bag and Cotton Mills, launching a lengthy strike that was at the heart of the American Federation of Labor's first major attempt to organize southern workers in over a decade. In its celebrity, the Fulton Mills strike was the regional contemporary of the well-known industrial conflicts in Lawrence, Massachusetts, and Ludlow, Colorado. Although ultimately unsuccessful, the strike was an important episode in the development of the New South, and as Clifford Kuhn demonstrates, its story sheds light on the industrialization, urbanization, and modernization of the region. Drawing on an extraordinary collection of sources--including reports from labor spies and company informants, photographs, federal investigations, oral histories, and newly uncovered records from the old mill's vaults--Kuhn vividly depicts the strike and the community in which it occurred. He also chronicles the struggle for public opinion that ensued between management, workers, union leaders, and other interested parties. Finally, Kuhn reflects on the legacy of the strike in southern history, exploring its complex ties to the evolving New South.

Nashville

Author : Scott Faragher
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Nashville: Gateway to the South is a unique, thorough, and up-to-date guide to every part of the city. Highlighted are its educational institutions, commerce, music and entertainment, clubs, restaurants, theaters, performance halls, listening rooms, honky-tonks, history, and many annual fairs, shows, and exhibitions.

Historic Preservation

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Cities in the Commonwealth

Author : Allen J. Share
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From the 1780s, when Louisville and Lexington were tiny clusters of houses in the wilderness, to the 1980s, when more than half of all Kentuckians live in urban areas, the growth of cities has affected nearly all aspects of life in the Commonwealth. These urban centers have led the state in economic, social, and cultural change. Cities in the Commonwealth examines the crises that have shaped the history of Kentucky's cities and sheds light on such continuing concerns as urban competition, provision of essential services, the importance of the arts, and the struggle for racial justice. By allowing contemporaries to tell much of the story in their own words, Allen J. Share conveys a sense of the exuberance and dynamism of urban life and thought in Kentucky.

Nashville Athens of the South

Author : William Henry McRaven
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A Season of Darkness

Author : Doug Jones
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The horrific true crime cold case of Marcia Trimble, the little girl who disappeared while selling Girl Scout cookies and was discovered a month later, strangled. This mystery haunted her family for over 30 years... When nine-year-old Marcia Trimble was murdered in 1975, her devastated parents believed justice would be served. But without a clear suspect in sight and without the ability to analyze DNA evidence, fingers pointed toward the family and toward neighborhood boys without any definitive conclusion. Police were left at a loss to find any kind of evidence that would lay this brutal murder case to rest and bring peace to the long-suffering family of this innocent little girl. A Season of Darkness catalogs the gruesome account of the murder and its awful aftermath, detailing the thirty years of wondering, silence, and investigation that would eventually lead to a shocking, unexpected, and long-awaited concusion.

Federal Register

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Economic Decisions of the Civil Aeronautics Board

Author : United States. Civil Aeronautics Board
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Failure to Pursue

Author : David Frey
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Was the Civil War preordained to last four years or were there reasons why neither side could land a knockout punch? From the outset, both North and South had anticipated a brief conflict but despite more than 50 bloody battles neither could force a decisive conclusion. For most of the war, these battles followed a pattern: the victors claimed the field and the vanquished retreated to rest, resupply and fight another day. Some generals began to realize that pursuit to capture or destroy the retreating enemy was needed to end the war—not an easy task. Taking a fresh look at the tactics that characterized many major combat actions in the war, this book examines the performance of unsuccessful (sometimes insubordinate) commanders and credits two generals with eventually seeing the need for organized pursuit.