Search results for: navigating-community-college-demands

Navigating Community College Demands

Author : Rebecca Diana Cox
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Defending the Community College Equity Agenda

Author : Thomas Bailey
File Size : 29.94 MB
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Urban and Regional Policy and its Effects

Author : Nancy Pindus
File Size : 63.47 MB
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Urban and Regional Policy and Its Effects, the second in a series, sets out to inform policymakers, practitioners, and scholars about the effectiveness of select policy approaches, reforms, and experiments in addressing key social and economic problems facing cities, suburbs, and metropolitan areas. The chapters analyze responses to six key policy challenges that most metropolitans areas and local communities face: • Creating quality neighborhoods for families • Governing effectively • Building human capital • Growing the middle class • Growing a competitive economy through industry-based strategies • Managing the spatial pattern of metropolitan growth and development Each chapter discusses a specific policy topic under one of these challenges. The authors present the essence of what is known, as well as the likely implications, and identify the knowledge gaps that need to be filled for the successful formulation and implementation of urban and regional policy. Contributors: Karen Chapple and Rick Jacobus (University of California, Berkeley and Burlington Associates), Jeffrey R. Henig and Elisabeth Thurston Fraser (Teachers College, Columbia University), W. Norton Grubb (University of California, Berkeley), Harry J. Holzer (Georgetown University and Urban Institute), Susan Christopherson and Michael H. Belzer (Cornell University and Wayne State University), and Rolf Pendall (Cornell University)

After Admission

Author : James E. Rosenbaum
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Enrollment at America's community colleges has exploded in recent years, with five times as many entering students today as in 1965. However, most community college students do not graduate; many earn no credits and may leave school with no more advantages in the labor market than if they had never attended. Experts disagree over the reason for community colleges' mixed record. Is it that the students in these schools are under-prepared and ill-equipped for the academic rigors of college? Are the colleges themselves not adapting to keep up with the needs of the new kinds of students they are enrolling? In After Admission, James Rosenbaum, Regina Deil-Amen, and Ann Person weigh in on this debate with a close look at this important trend in American higher education. After Admission compares community colleges with private occupational colleges that offer accredited associates degrees. The authors examine how these different types of institutions reach out to students, teach them social and cultural skills valued in the labor market, and encourage them to complete a degree. Rosenbaum, Deil-Amen, and Person find that community colleges are suffering from a kind of identity crisis as they face the inherent complexities of guiding their students towards four-year colleges or to providing them with vocational skills to support a move directly into the labor market. This confusion creates administrative difficulties and problems allocating resources. However, these contradictions do not have to pose problems for students. After Admission shows that when colleges present students with clear pathways, students can effectively navigate the system in a way that fits their needs. The occupational colleges the authors studied employed close monitoring of student progress, regular meetings with advisors and peer cohorts, and structured plans for helping students meet career goals in a timely fashion. These procedures helped keep students on track and, the authors suggest, could have the same effect if implemented at community colleges. As college access grows in America, institutions must adapt to meet the needs of a new generation of students. After Admission highlights organizational innovations that can help guide students more effectively through higher education.

Working class Minority Students Routes to Higher Education

Author : Roberta Espinoza
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While stories of working-class and minority students overcoming obstacles to attend and graduate from college tend to emphasize the individualistic and meritocratic aspect, this book - based in extensive empirical study of American high school classrooms, and in theories of social and cultural capital - examines the social relations that often underpin such successes, highlighting the significant formal and informal academic interventions by educators and other education professionals.

Practical Leadership in Community Colleges

Author : George R. Boggs
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Anticipate, manage, and overcome the complex issues facing community colleges Practical Leadership in Community Colleges offers a path forward through the challenges community colleges face every day. Through field observations, reports, news coverage, and interviews with leaders and policy makers, this book digs deep into the issues confronting college leaders and provides clear direction for managing through the storm. With close examination of both emerging trends and perennial problems, the discussion delves into issues brought about by changing demographics, federal and state mandates, public demand, economic cycles, student unrest, employee groups, trustees, college supporters, and more to provide practical guidance toward optimal outcomes for all stakeholders. Written by former presidents, including a past president of the American Association of Community Colleges, this book provides expert guidance on anticipating and managing the critical issues that affect the entire institution. Both authors serve as consultants, executive coaches, and advisors to top leaders, higher education institutions, and leadership development programs throughout the United States. Community colleges are facing increasingly complex issues from both without and within. Some can be avoided, others only mitigated—but all must be managed, and college leaders must be fully prepared or risk failing the students and the community. This book provides real-world guidance for current and emerging leaders and trustees seeking more effective management methods, with practical insight and expert perspective. Tackle the college completion challenge and performance-based funding initiatives Manage through economic cycles, declining support, and calls for accountability Delve into the issues of privatization and employee unionization Execute strategies to align institutional goals and mission Manage organizational change and new ways of thinking that are essential in today's competitive environment Manage issues involving diversity, inclusiveness, and equity Prepare adequately for campus emergencies Community colleges are the heartbeat of the nation's higher education system, and bear the tremendous responsibility of serving the needs of a vast and varied student body. Every day may bring new issues, but effective management allows institutions to rise to the challenge rather than falter under pressure. Practical Leadership in Community Colleges goes beyond theory to provide the practical guidance leadership needs to more effectively lead institutions to achieve results and serve the students and the community.

The Money Myth

Author : W. Norton Grubb
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Can money buy high-quality education? Studies find only a weak relationship between public school funding and educational outcomes. In The Money Myth, W. Norton Grubb proposes a powerful paradigm shift in the way we think about why some schools thrive and others fail. The greatest inequalities in America's schools lie in factors other than fiscal support. Fundamental differences in resources other than money—for example, in leadership, instruction, and tracking policies—explain the deepening divide in the success of our nation's schoolchildren. The Money Myth establishes several principles for a bold new approach to education reform. Drawing on a national longitudinal dataset collected over twelve years, Grubb makes a crucial distinction between "simple" resources and those "compound," "complex," and "abstract" resources that cannot be readily bought. Money can buy simple resources—such as higher teacher salaries and smaller class sizes—but these resources are actually some of the weakest predictors of educational outcomes. On the other hand, complex resources pertaining to school practices are astonishingly strong predictors of success. Grubb finds that tracking policies have the most profound and consistent impact on student outcomes over time. Schools often relegate low-performing students—particularly minorities—to vocational, remedial, and special education tracks. So even in well-funded schools, resources may never reach the students who need them most. Grubb also finds that innovation in the classroom has a critical impact on student success. Here, too, America's schools are stratified. Teachers in underperforming schools tend to devote significant amounts of time to administration and discipline, while instructors in highly ranked schools dedicate the bulk of their time to "engaged learning," using varied pedagogical approaches. Effective schools distribute leadership among many instructors and administrators, and they foster a sense of both trust and accountability. These schools have a clear mission and coherent agenda for reaching goals. Underperforming schools, by contrast, implement a variety of fragmented reforms and practices without developing a unified plan. This phenomenon is perhaps most powerfully visible in the negative repercussions of No Child Left Behind. In a frantic attempt to meet federal standards and raise test scores quickly, more and more schools are turning to scripted "off the shelf" curricula. These practices discourage student engagement, suppress teacher creativity, and hold little promise of improving learning beyond the most basic skills. Grubb shows that infusions of money alone won't eradicate inequality in America's schools. We need to address the vast differences in the way school communities operate. By looking beyond school finance, The Money Myth gets to the core reasons why education in America is so unequal and provides clear recommendations for addressing this chronic national problem.

Shared Governance in Higher Educat

Author : Sharon F. Cramer
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Explores the impact of shared governance in times of campus and system transition.

The Cultural Matrix

Author : Orlando Patterson
File Size : 85.80 MB
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The Cultural Matrix seeks to unravel an American paradox: the socioeconomic crisis and social isolation of disadvantaged black youth, on the one hand, and their extraordinary integration and prominence in popular culture on the other. This interdisciplinary work explains how a complex matrix of cultures influences black youth.

The University Next Door

Author : Mark Schneider
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The challenges public comprehensive universities face today are expanding—they have been challenged to enroll and graduate more students, adopt new technologies that lower cost without sacrificing quality, and align program and curricular offerings with the skills that employers require. While these universities have a long history of adapting to change, today’s environment will likely test the capabilities of even the most adaptive institutions. This volume assembles a team of experts from a variety of disciplines to examine both the history of the comprehensive university and what lies ahead. Overall, the book grapples with such questions as: How do these institutions adapt to serve the growing population of non-traditional students? How well do they prepare graduates for the labor market? Can partnerships between community colleges and comprehensive universities bolster student success? The University Next Door draws much-needed attention to a set of institutions that has historically received little notice, yet play an important role in meeting our new attainment goals and helping the American economy grow. Book Features: Examines the role of comprehensive universities from start to finish—their history and future. Uses empirical analysis to explore complex questions about which students choose these universities and why. Explores how these institutions might struggle under a federal ratings system such as the one proposed by President Obama. Discusses how these institutions can better monitor the needs of the economy and better educate students to fill those needs. Provides recommendations to inform future decisions about higher education policy. “In chapter after chapter, the contributors critically assess whether comprehensive universities can respond to the nation's ambitious call to action. This compelling volume is a valuable starting point for anybody concerned about the future of the institutions that help define American higher education as we know it today.” —Richard G. Rhoda, executive director, Tennessee Higher Education Commission “Schneider/Deane provides much-needed illumination on the U.S. higher education sector that will play a critical role in meeting the nation’s educational, workforce, and economic goals. It will serve as a valuable resource for all stakeholders who seek to affect positive change in policy and practice at public comprehensive universities.” —Daniel J. Hurley, associate vice president for government relations and state policy, American Association of State Colleges and Universities

Assessing Student Learning in the Community and Two Year College

Author : Marilee J. Bresciani Ludvik
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This is a practical resource for community and two year college professionals engaged at all levels of learning outcomes assessment, in both academic and co-curricular environments. It is designed as a guide both to inform the creation of new assessment efforts and to enhance and strengthen assessment programs already established, or in development. Each chapter addresses a key component of the assessment process, beginning with the creation of a learning-centered culture and the development and articulation of shared outcomes goals and priorities. Subsequent chapters lead the reader through the development of a plan, the selection of assessment methods, and the analysis of results. The book concludes by discussing the communication of results and their use in decision making; integrating the conclusions in program review as well as to inform budgeting; and, finally, evaluating the process for continuous improvement, as well as engaging in reflection. The book is illustrated by examples developed by faculty and student affairs/services professionals at community and two year colleges from across the country. Furthermore, to ensure its relevance and applicability for its targeted readership, each chapter has at least one author who is a community college or two-year college professional. Contributors are drawn from the following colleges: Borough of Manhattan Community College David Phillips Buffalo State College Joy Battison Kimberly Kline Booker Piper Butler County Community College Sunday Faseyitan California State University, Fullerton John Hoffman Genesee Community College Thomas Priester Virginia Taylor Heald College Megan Lawrence Stephanie Romano (now with Education Affiliates) Hobart and William Smith Colleges Stacey Pierce Miami Dade College John Frederick Barbara Rodriguez Northern Illinois University Victoria Livingston Paradise Valley Community College Paul Dale San Diego Mesa College Jill Baker Julianna Barnes San Diego State University Marilee Bresciani San Juan College David Eppich Stark State College Barbara Milliken University of Akron Sandra Coyner Megan Moore Gardner

Our Kids

Author : Robert D. Putnam
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A New York Times bestseller and “a passionate, urgent” (The New Yorker) examination of the growing inequality gap from the bestselling author of Bowling Alone: why fewer Americans today have the opportunity for upward mobility. Central to the very idea of America is the principle that we are a nation of opportunity. But over the last quarter century we have seen a disturbing “opportunity gap” emerge. We Americans have always believed that those who have talent and try hard will succeed, but this central tenet of the American Dream seems no longer true or at the least, much less true than it was. In Our Kids, Robert Putnam offers a personal and authoritative look at this new American crisis, beginning with the example of his high school class of 1959 in Port Clinton, Ohio. The vast majority of those students went on to lives better than those of their parents. But their children and grandchildren have faced diminishing prospects. Putnam tells the tale of lessening opportunity through poignant life stories of rich, middle class, and poor kids from cities and suburbs across the country, brilliantly blended with the latest social-science research. “A truly masterful volume” (Financial Times), Our Kids provides a disturbing account of the American dream that is “thoughtful and persuasive” (The Economist). Our Kids offers a rare combination of individual testimony and rigorous evidence: “No one can finish this book and feel complacent about equal opportunity” (The New York Times Book Review).

Mastering the Job Search Process in Recreation and Leisure Services

Author : Craig M. Ross
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Mastering the Job Search Process in Recreation and Leisure Services is a practical guide for those who want to work in the recreation and leisure services field. This book simplifies the process of securing a job or internship by explaining every step from both an employers and applicants point of view. Based on years of experience in hiring, this text offers honest advice on the best job search practices.

Marginalized Students

Author : Elizabeth M. Cox
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Gone are the days when the term diversity may have been usedto solely signify the color of one's skin or gender. This volumeexamines how diverse and marginalized populations aresituated within American community colleges amd pushes theboundaries of our understanding of these terms. The editors and contributing authors examine various studentgroups as well as give voice to the marginalization felt by a groupof faculty. Topics include: Examining the concept of student marginalization through aframework based on Dewey's 1916 work, Democracy andEducation Experiences of Adult English as Second Language learners Seeing the community college environment through the eyes ofstudent athletes Current research on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, andqueer (LGBTQ) community college students and the need for more Student Veterans Underprepared college students and community College faculty in correctionalinstitutions. The volume concludes with key resources for anyone who workswith or researches marginalized populations. The resources includesources for further reading, existing organizations serving variousmarginalized groups, and some possible funding opportunities. This is the 155th volume of the Jossey-Bass quarterly reportseries New Directions for Community Colleges.Essential to the professional libraries of presidents, vicepresidents, deans, and other leaders in today's open-doorinstitutions, New Directions for Community Collegesprovides expert guidance in meeting the challenges of theirdistinctive and expanding educational mission.

The Mental Health of Undocumented Latino College Students

Author : Martha Esmeralda Zamudio
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In this study, I describe the stressors affecting undocumented Latino college students, and the mental health consequences of these stressors. This impact is an important one to consider because there is a lack of clinical literature about these students and the results of this study can help clinicians learn about the lived experiences of navigating the U.S. college system as an immigrant and undocumented Latino. Twelve undocumented Latino college students, ages 18-24 years old, of the 1.5 generation (born outside the U.S.) currently attending community college, state college, or university in the San Francisco Bay Area and Sacramento California were interviewed for this study. Participants were chosen by criteria sampling through college clubs, centers, and organizations that serve undocumented students. The interview questions asked about demographics, family life, friendships, sense of belonging, political awareness, finances, education, resiliency, psychological symptoms, and coping. The interviews were analyzed using Brofenbrenner’s Ecological Theory (1994) and phenomenology. Results point to stressors in the areas of immigration/policy, finances, family, academics, identity and sense of belonging. The most powerful stressor was fear of deportation — for oneself or one’s family members. Leaving home for the first time was a major stress, as was making friends beyond their family, and being unavailable to the family in case of emergencies. Adapting to the college culture was an additional set of acculturation demands —it was an environment that differed from their childhoods, their hometowns, language, and community. Participants felt different from their peers. The financial aid process, the added steps in applying and renewing their DACA, and then suddenly needing to disclose their undocumented status in order to receive services were stressful, especially after many years of trying to be safe by living in the shadows. Participants described symptoms of depression, general and social anxiety, trauma, and adjustment problems. Clinical implications of the findings and directions for future research were suggested. These findings will inform therapists, counselors, and academics of the psychological needs and stressors experienced by the undocumented Latino college student population.

Key Lessons on the College Admissions Process a Brief Handbook for Undergraduate Enrollment Planning

Author : Charlene Adams
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Key Lessons on the College Admissions Process: A Brief Handbook for Undergraduate Enrollment Planning" gives practical step-by-step information to knowledge-scanning readers on the college admissions process and navigating the demands of the college environment. In this how-to-handbook, each chapter gives prospective college students easy to follow advice and instructions on how apply for college admissions and persist as freshmen, transfers, and international students. Parents are also provided detailed information to help understand the admissions process.

General Report of the Operations of the Marine Survey of India

Author : India. Marine Survey Department
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Positioning Student Affairs for Sustainable Change

Author : Linda Kuk
File Size : 66.55 MB
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At a time of increasing student diversity, concern about security, demand for greater accountability, and of economic difficulty, what does the future hold for higher education, and how can student affairs organizations adapt to the increasing and changing demands? How can university leaders position existing resources to effectively address these and other emerging challenges with a sense of opportunity rather than dread? How can organizations be redesigned to sustain change while achieving excellence? As student affairs organizations have grown and become increasingly complex in order to meet new demands, they have often emphasized the expansion of their missions to the detriment of focusing on understanding their roles in relationship to other units, to reviewing their cultures and structures, and to considering how they can improve their effectiveness as organizations. This book provides the tools for organizational analysis and sustainability. Intended for practitioners, graduate students, interns and student affairs leaders, this book presents the key ideas and concepts from business-oriented organizational behavior and change theories, and demonstrates how they can be useful in, and be applied to, student affairs practice – and, in particular, how readers can use these theories to sustain change and enhance their organization’s ability to adapt to complex emerging challenges. At the same time it holds to values and perspectives that support the human dimension of organizational life. Recognizing the complexity of today’s organizations and the value of viewing them from multiple perspectives, this book follows the emerging practice of providing three general epistemological perspectives – the Positivist, Social Constructionist, and Postmodernist – for analyzing often paradoxical organizational structures, environments, and behavior. The book explores the environmental context of student affairs, and how the organization interacts with both the internal and external environments; examines the human dimension of organizations, through a review of individual attributes, human need and motivation, social comparison theory and organizational learning theory; presents the dimensions of structure and design theory and discusses why student affairs organizations need to think differently about how they organize their resources; considers the context and process of organizational change, and the dynamics of decision making, power, conflict and communication; addresses the role of assessment and evaluation; and new forms of leadership. Each chapter opens with a case study, and closes with a set of reflective questions. The authors have all served as practitioners within student affairs and now teach and advise graduate students and future leaders in the field.

Educating Literacy Teachers Online

Author : Lane W. Clarke
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This book is a comprehensive guide for literacy teacher educators and professional development trainers who teach and work in online settings. The authors provide tools, techniques, and resources for developing courses, workshops, and other online learning experiences, including blended/hybrid delivery formats that combine face-to-face meetings with online practices. Moving away from traditional discussions in which technology and delivery systems dominate the conversation, this book focuses on the literacy instructor with techniques for building effective learning communities. The authors outline the unique pedagogical challenges posed by online courses and offer guidance for making decisions about what tools to use for specific instructional purposes. More than simply a “how-to” book, this resource will encourage novice and experienced instructors to extend their thinking and enable online literacy teacher education to grow in productive ways. Book Features: Support for those teaching in many different roles, including program coordinators, professors, and adjuncts. A focus on pedagogical innovation as the key to success, with concrete examples of instructional and assessment practices. Connections to the IRA Standards for Reading Professionals and other national standards for teacher education. A companion website where online literacy teacher educators can communicate and share resources. “Be prepared to experience a compelling journey. . . . This might very well be the book that inspires you, like me, to find a trusted colleague, take a few risks, and begin your own journey toward moving a literacy course or whole program online.” —From the Foreword by Julie Coiro, University of Rhode Island Lane W. Clarke is assistant professor and literacy concentration leader in the Education Department of the University of New England. Susan Watts-Taffe is associate professor and coordinator of the Reading Endorsement program at the University of Cincinnati.

This Book Is Not Required

Author : Inge Bell
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This Fifth Edition of the underground classic This Book Is Not Required: An Emotional and Intellectual Survival Manual for Students, by Inge Bell, Bernard McCrane, John Gunderson, and Teri Anderson, breaks new ground in participatory education, offering insight and inspiration to help undergraduates make the most of their college years. This edition continues to teach about the college experience as a whole—looking at the personal, social, intellectual, technological, and spiritual demands and opportunities—while incorporating new material highly relevant to today’s students. The material is presented in a personable and straightforward manner, maintaining Dr. Inge Bell’s illuminating writing style throughout, and inviting students to take responsibility for, and make the most of, their educational experiences.