Search results for: plutonium-disposition-program

Plutonium Disposition Program

Author : U S Government Accountability Offi Gao
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PLUTONIUM DISPOSITION PROGRAM: DOE Needs to Analyze the Root Causes of Cost Increases and Develop Better Cost Estimates

Plutonium Disposition

Author : United States
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Surplus Plutonium Disposition DOE EIS 0283 for Siting Construction and Operation of Three Facilities for Plutonium Disposition

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Plutonium Disposition and the U S Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility

Author : United States
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Physics and Fuel Performance of Reactor Based Plutonium Disposition

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Study of Plutonium Disposition Using the GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor ABWR

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The end of the cold war and the resulting dismantlement of nuclear weapons has resulted in the need for the U.S. to disposition 50 to 100 metric tons of excess of plutonium in parallel with a similar program in Russia. A number of studies, including the recently released National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study, have recommended conversion of plutonium into spent nuclear fuel with its high radiation barrier as the best means of providing long-term diversion resistance to this material. The NAS study {open_quotes}Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium{close_quotes} identified light water reactor spent fuel as the most readily achievable and proven form for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium. The study also stressed the need for a U.S. disposition program which would enhance the prospects for a timely reciprocal program agreement with Russia. This summary provides the key findings of a GE study where plutonium is converted into Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel and a 1350 MWe GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) is utilized to convert the plutonium to spent fuel. The ABWR represents the integration of over 30 years of experience gained worldwide in the design, construction and operation of BWRs. It incorporates advanced features to enhance reliability and safety, minimize waste and reduce worker exposure. For example, the core is never uncovered nor is any operator action required for 72 hours after any design basis accident. Phase 1 of this study was documented in a GE report dated May 13, 1993. DOEs̀ Phase 1 evaluations cited the ABWR as a proven technical approach for the disposition of plutonium. This Phase 2 study addresses specific areas which the DOE authorized as appropriate for more in-depth evaluations. A separate report addresses the findings relative to the use of existing BWRs to achieve the same goal.

Proceedings of the Workshop on the Physics and Fuel Performance of Reactor based Plutonium Disposition

Author : OECD Nuclear Energy Agency
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Following recent disarmament agreements, the Russian Federation and the USA have declared part of their stockpiles of weapons-grade plutonium as a surplus to their national defense needs. This material needs to be disposed of, and one of the suggested means of doing so is burning it in existing reactors and transforming the material into spent fuel. The experience in these two countries with mixed oxide fuel (MOX) is either dated or scarce. Several European countries and Japan, however, have acquired much experience in using MOX fuel in reactors which was shared at this important workshop. This publication presents the workshop results which reviewed existing technical information from the civil nuclear power programmes that are beneficial to weapons-grade plutonium disposition. It also proposes concrete actions that could help expedite this process in the near future.

Disposing of Weapons grade Plutonium

Author : CSIS Senior Policy Panel on the Safe, Timely, and Effective Disposition of Surplus U.S. and Russian Weapons-Grade Plutonium
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SRS MOX Fuel Lead Assemblies Data Report for the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Environmental Impact Statement

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The purpose of this document is to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Materials Disposition Program's preparation of the draft surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement. This is one of several responses to data call requests for background information on activities associated with the operation of the lead assembly (LA) mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility. DOE-MD requested that the DOE Site Operations Offices nominate DOE sites that meet established minimum requirements that could produce MOX LAs. Six initial site combinations were proposed: (1) Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) with support from Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), (2) Hanford, (3) Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) with support from Pantex, (4) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), (5) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), and (6) Savannah River Site(SRS). After further analysis by the sites and DOE-MD, five site combinations were established as possible candidates for producing MOX LAs: (1) ANL-W with support from INEEL, (2) Hanford, (3) LANL, (4) LLNL, and (5) SRS. SRS has proposed an LA MOX fuel fabrication approach that would be done entirely inside an S and S Category 1 area. An alternate approach would allow fabrication of fuel pellets and assembly of fuel rods in an S and S Category 2 or 3 facility with storage of bulk PuO2 and assembly, storage, and shipping of fuel bundles in an S and S Category 1 facility. The total Category 1 approach, which is the recommended option, would be done in the 221-H Canyon Building. A facility that was never in service will be removed from one area, and a hardened wall will be constructed in another area to accommodate execution of the LA fuel fabrication. The non-Category 1 approach would require removal of process equipment in the FB-Line metal production and packaging glove boxes, which requires work in a contamination area. The Immobilization Hot Demonstration Program equipment in the Savannah River Technology Center would need to be removed to accommodate pellet fabrication. This work would also be in a contaminated area.

Fiscal Year 2015 Budget of the U S Government

Author : Office of Office of Management and Budget (U.S.)
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Contains the Budget Message of the President, information on the President's priorities and budget overviews by agency, and summary tables.

Safety Issues Associated with Plutonium Involvement in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle

Author : Theodore A. Parish
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The "VOLGA" conferences, hosted in odd-numbered years by the Department of Theoretical and Experimental Reactor Physics of the Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI), are some of the most prestigious technical meetings held in Russia. Traditionally, these conferences present the opportunity for reactor physicists from around the world to gather at MEPhI's holiday camp on the banks of the Volga river (near Tver) to exchange ideas and explore innovative concepts related to nuclear power development. In 1997, NATO became involved in the "VOLGA" meetings for the first time by co-sponsoring "VOLGA97" as an advanced research workshop. This workshop broke with tradition a bit in that the venue was moved from MEPhI's holiday camp to a location nearer Moscow. The workshop program was effectively organized in order to cover a broad range of topics relating to the theme of the meeting. Generally, the papers concerned safety related questions associated with utilizing both weapons-grade and reactor-grade plutonium in the nuclear fuel cycle, including facility requirements, licensing issues, proliferation risks, and a variety of advanced concepts for alternative fuel cycles. The program contained a total of ninety-nine papers presented in five days of sessions.

Nuclear Nonproliferation

Author : Gene Aloise
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The end of the Cold War left the U.S. with a surplus of weapons-grade plutonium, which poses proliferation and safety risks. Much of this material is found in a key nuclear weapon component known as a pit. The DoE plans to dispose of at least 34 metric tons of plutonium by fabricating it into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for domestic nuclear reactors. To do so, two facilities are being constructed -- a MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility and a Waste Solidification Building. This report assessed the: (1) cost and schedule status of the construction projects; (2) status of NNSA's plans for pit disassembly and conversion; (3) status of NNSA's plans to obtain customers for MOX fuel; and (4) actions to provide independent nuclear safety oversight. Charts and tables.

Energy and Water Development Appropriations for Fiscal Year 2003

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Environmental Impact Statement of the Construction and Operation of a Proposed Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility at the Savannah River Site South Carolina

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Evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposed mixed oxide fuel (MOX) fabrication facility that would convert depleted uranium and weapons-grade plutonium into MOX fuel.

Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium

Author : National Academy of Sciences
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Within the next decade, many thousands of U.S. and Russian nuclear weapons are slated to be retired as a result of nuclear arms reduction treaties and unilateral pledges. A hundred tons or more of plutonium and tons of highly enriched uranium will no longer be needed. The management and disposition of these fissile materials, the essential ingredients of nuclear weapons, pose urgent challenges for international security. This book offers recommendations for all phases of the problem, from dismantlement of excess warheads, through intermediate storage of the fissle materials they contain, to ultimate disposition of the plutonium.

Department of Energy Non proliferation Programs with Russia

Author : United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Foreign Relations
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Congressional Record

Author : United States. Congress
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The Congressional Record is the official record of the proceedings and debates of the United States Congress. It is published daily when Congress is in session. The Congressional Record began publication in 1873. Debates for sessions prior to 1873 are recorded in The Debates and Proceedings in the Congress of the United States (1789-1824), the Register of Debates in Congress (1824-1837), and the Congressional Globe (1833-1873)

An Evaluation of the Electrometallurgical Approach for Treatment of Excess Weapons Plutonium

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United States Code Congressional and Administrative News

Author : United States
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Nonproliferation and Threat Reduction Assistance

Author : Amy F. Woolf
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Congress passed the Nunn-Lugar amendment, authorizing U.S. threat reduction assistance to the former Soviet Union, in Nov. 1991, after a failed coup in Moscow and the disintegration of the Soviet Union raised concerns about the safety and security of Soviet nuclear weapons. The annual program has grown from $400 million to over $1 billion/year across 3 agencies. It has also evolved from an emergency response to impending chaos in the Soviet Union, to a more comprehensive threat reduction and non-proliferation effort, to a broader program seeking to keep nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons from leaking into the hands of rogue nations or terrorists. This report discusses issues related to U.S. non-proliferation and threat reduction assistance. Illus.