Search results for: rediscovering-the-old-tokaido

Rediscovering the Old Tokaido

Author : Patrick Carey
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For the first time in an English language edition published outside Japan, all 55 prints of Hiroshige's 'Fifty-three Stages of the Tokaido' are reproduced in full colour, supporting a detailed and intriguing account of the author's rediscovery on foot of the historic 303-mile road from Edo (Tokyo) to Kyoto. Remarkably, the Old Tokaido can still be found in many locations and photographs of the modern parallel the old.

Hokusai 53 Stations of the T kaid 1801

Author : Cristina Berna
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Hokusai’s 53 Stations of the Tōkaidō 1801 is something completely different! It is his first. It is different from his famous 36 Views of Mt Fuji, which are sublime artistic expressions distilling a long life’s work. It is different from much of Hokusai’s other well known work, like his 100 Views of Mt Fuji. But in that series Hokusai still retained a lot of the humor and the caricature found here. It is different from the many other well known 53 Stations of the Tōkaidō in that Hokusai does not focus on the landscape and the markers that Hiroshige and others showed. Instead Hokusai focus on the events, the interactions between the travellers, the tales that you will share with your friends when you get back home. It was a great and earlier contribution to the Tōkaidō literature.

Van Gogh Landscapes

Author : Cristina Berna
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Vincent Van Gogh (1853 – 1890) is often mentioned as one of the best examples of Japonism, Western art inspired by Japanese art. Van Gogh was infatuated with a vision of Japanese art. He experienced this mainly from Japanese woodblock prints which became widely available after Commodore Matthew Perry forced Japan to open with the Convention of Kanagawa in 1854 after abt 250 years of seclusion. Van Gogh and his brother Theo dealt in these prints for a while and Van Gogh´s studio was literally plastered with them. Van Gogh vision of Japan was a mythical fantasy, an ideal for the artist, and he even tried to establish an artist´s colony to live out this dream. Japan, on the other hand, and especially the woodblock print artists, were inspired by earlier Dutch engraved prints, which had a profound influence on artists like Katsushika Hokusai from abt 1800. It was from these prints Western perspective entered into Japanese art. In the period from abt 1800 to 1850 Japanese prints evolved with Hokusai´s 36 Views of Mt Fuji and became the inspiration that met painters like van Gogh. In a way, what these Western artists saw, was a Japanese mirror of their own processed artistic tradition.

Kyushu Gateway to Japan

Author : Andrew Cobbing
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This book examines key themes of Kyushu’s history from earliest times – the cultural interaction with the continental mainland, settlement, location and infrastructure as well as trade and commerce – arguing that it was the principal stepping-stone in terms of Japan’s cultural, social and economic advance through history up to the present day.

Newsletter East Asian Art and Archaeology

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The East

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Transactions of the Asiatic Society of Japan

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Proceedings

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Japan Close up

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Hokusai s Great Wave

Author : Christine M. E. Guth
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Hokusai’s “Great Wave,” as it is commonly known today, is arguably one of Japan’s most successful exports, its commanding cresting profile instantly recognizable no matter how different its representations in media and style. In this richly illustrated and highly original study, Christine Guth examines the iconic wave from its first publication in 1831 through the remarkable range of its articulations, arguing that it has been a site where the tensions, contradictions, and, especially, the productive creativities of the local and the global have been negotiated and expressed. She follows the wave’s trajectory across geographies, linking its movements with larger political, economic, technological, and sociocultural developments. Adopting a case study approach, Guth explores issues that map the social life of the iconic wave across time and place, from the initial reception of the woodblock print in Japan, to the image’s adaptations as part of “international nationalism,” its place in American perceptions of Japan, its commercial adoption for lifestyle branding, and finally to its identification as a tsunami, bringing not culture but disaster in its wake. Wide ranging in scope yet grounded in close readings of disparate iterations of the wave, multidisciplinary and theoretically informed in its approach, Hokusai’s Great Wave will change both how we look at this global icon and the way we study the circulation of Japanese prints. This accessible and engagingly written work moves beyond the standard hagiographical approach to recognize, as categories of analysis, historical and geographic contingency as well as visual and technical brilliance. It is a book that will interest students of Japan and its culture and more generally those seeking fresh perspectives on the dynamics of cultural globalization.