Search results for: reimagining-detroit

Reimagining Detroit

Author : John Gallagher
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"John Gallagher's Reimagining Detroit provides a thought-provoking analysis of a city devastated by deindustrialization and a clear vision for a future Detroit as a smaller, vibrant city. This thinking goes against the grain as many public policy experts and planners believe that fixing Detroit requires a repopulation of the city's current footprint. Policy makers and community leaders should examine Gallagher's paradigm-shifting idea that when you plan for shrinkage, growth happens. Reimagining Detroit is a must-read for all engaged in the hard work of rebuilding Detroit."-Sheila Cockrel, former Detroit city councilwoman and adjunct professor in the Wayne State University Irvin D. Reid Honors College "John Gallagher has done a great job of synthesizing a host of important and emerging ideas that could dramatically change Detroit's future and of presenting them in ways that are clear and vivid and that both practitioners and laypeople will readily grasp. This is a valuable book, not only for Detroiters, but for anyone with a physical, financial, or emotional stake in the future of America's shrinking industrial cities."-Alan Mallach, non-resident senior fellow in the Metropolitan Policy Program at the Brookings Institution and author of Bringing Buildings Back: From Vacant Properties to Community Assets" What is really distinctive about John Gallagher's contribution to the Detroit saga is his perspective. This important and timely book reflects his design/architectural background, his business experience, and the investigative skills he honed at the Detroit Free Press. This rich background is badly needed, as much of the writing about the post-industrial urban future, including Detroit's, is narrow or opinionated or worse, both. Gallagher's book will not be the last to explore the journey that Detroit might take through the twenty-first century, but this road map will be essential reading for all."-Robin Boyle, director of the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at Wayne State University "Whether urban or rural dweller, academic or practitioner, the reader takes from Gallagher a deeper appreciation of both the challenges and opportunities that exist within our cities, challenges and opportunities that will ultimately impact our country."-Jay Williams, mayor of Youngstown, Ohio, from the foreword

Why Detroit Matters

Author : Doucet, Brian
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Detroit has come to symbolise deindustrialization and the challenges, and opportunities, it presents. As many cities struggle with urban decline, racial and ethnic tensions and the consequences of neoliberal governance and political fragmentation, Detroit’s relevance grows stronger. Why Detroit Matters bridges academic and non-academic responses to this extreme example of a fractured and divided, post-industrial city. Contributions from many of the leading scholars on Detroit are joined by influential writers, planners, artists and activists who have contributed chapters drawing on their experiences and ideas. The book concludes with interviews with some of the city’s most important visionaries who are engaged in inspiring practices which provide powerful lessons for Detroit and other cities around the world. The book will be a valuable reference for scholars, practitioners and students from across disciplines including geography, planning, architecture, sociology, urban studies, history, American studies, and economics.

Revolution Detroit

Author : John Gallagher
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After decades of suburban sprawl, job loss, and lack of regional government, Detroit has become a symbol of post-industrial distress and also one of the most complex urban environments in the world. In Revolution Detroit: Strategies for Urban Reinvention, John Gallagher argues that Detroit's experience can offer valuable lessons to other cities that are, or will soon be, dealing with the same broken municipal model. A follow-up to his award-winning 2010 work, Reimagining Detroit, this volume looks at Detroit's successes and failures in confronting its considerable challenges. It also looks at other ideas for reinvention drawn from the recent history of other cities, including Cleveland, Flint, Richmond, Philadelphia, and Youngstown, as well as overseas cities, including Manchester and Leipzig. This book surveys four key areas: governance, education and crime, economic models, and the repurposing of vacant urban land. Among the topics Gallagher covers are effective new urban governance models developed in Cleveland and Detroit; new education models highlighting low-income-but-high-achievement schools and districts; creative new entrepreneurial business models emerging in Detroit and other post-industrial cities; and examples of successful repurposing of vacant urban land through urban agriculture, restoration of natural landscapes, and the use of art in public places. He concludes with a cautious yet hopeful message that Detroit may prove to be the world's most important venue for successful urban experimentation and that the reinvention portrayed in the book can be repeated in many cities. Gallagher's extensive traveling and research, along with his long career covering urban redevelopment for the Detroit Free Press, has given him an unmatched perspective on Detroit's story. Readers interested in urban studies and recent Detroit history will appreciate this thoughtful assessment of the best practices and obvious errors when it comes to reinventing our cities.

Urban Politics

Author : Bernard H. Ross
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URBAN POLITICS: POWER IN METROPOLITAN AMERICA mixes the best classic theory and research on urban politics with the most recent developments in urban and metropolitan affairs. Six fundamental themes guide the book: the importance of private power and the rise of public-private partnerships; the continuing role of formal rules and structures of government; the importance of external affairs and intergovernmental relations in the modern city; commonalties and differences among Frostbelt and Sunbelt cities; the complexity of racial issues and the effect of the new immigration; and the importance of the gendered city.

Michigan History

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Reimagining Indian Country

Author : Nicolas G. Rosenthal
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For decades, most American Indians have lived in cities, not on reservations or in rural areas. Still, scholars, policymakers, and popular culture often regard Indians first as reservation peoples, living apart from non-Native Americans. In this book, Nicolas Rosenthal reorients our understanding of the experience of American Indians by tracing their migration to cities, exploring the formation of urban Indian communities, and delving into the shifting relationships between reservations and urban areas from the early twentieth century to the present. With a focus on Los Angeles, which by 1970 had more Native American inhabitants than any place outside the Navajo reservation, Reimagining Indian Country shows how cities have played a defining role in modern American Indian life and examines the evolution of Native American identity in recent decades. Rosenthal emphasizes the lived experiences of Native migrants in realms including education, labor, health, housing, and social and political activism to understand how they adapted to an urban environment, and to consider how they formed--and continue to form--new identities. Though still connected to the places where indigenous peoples have preserved their culture, Rosenthal argues that Indian identity must be understood as dynamic and fully enmeshed in modern global networks.

Reimagining American Theatre

Author : Robert Brustein
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In his collection of essays and reviews, Robert Brustein makes the argument that the American Theatre is enjoying a renaissance that has not been unacknowledged.

Reimagining Space

Author : Linda Dalrymple Henderson
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La línea continua will feature an extraordinary selection of Latin American modern and contemporary art from the collection of Judy and Charles Tate, the entirety of which has been promised to the Blanton Museum of Art. The gift will introduce new artists to the Blanton's collection, while building on the museum's existing holdings of modern and post-war innovation in Latin America. Highlights from this promised gift include a cubist-period drawing by Diego Rivera (ca. 1917); two paintings by Wifredo Lam that span his cubist experimentations made in France during late 1930s to the mature style he developed after his return to Cuba in the 1940s; a abstract mosaic by Carlos Mérida; a 1946 drawing by Frida Kahlo; a 1951 surrealist painting by Leonora Carrington; mid-20th-century kinetic art from Venezuelan masters Jesus Rafael Soto, Carlos Cruz-Diez; Brazilian concrete and neo-concrete art by Lygia Clark, Willys de Castro and Hélio Oiticica; and whimsical contemporary works by Jorge Macchi, Sebastián Gordín, and Tunga.

The Economist

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Integrating Industry

Author : Matt Allen Snoap
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Reimagining West Coconut Grove

Author : Samina Quraeshi
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This collection of essays recounts recent efforts by the University of Miami and some of its local partners to devise an interdisciplinary approach to strengthening community in a distressed inner- city neighborhood. It also takes a hard look at the problems of community building, the potential of interdisciplinary and place-based curricula,

Woman Writer

Author : Joyce Carol Oates
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Twenty-seven essays touch upon everything from Moby Dick to Boxing, cover literati from Emily Dickinson to Kafka, and take up the fiery debate over differences and similarities between male and female writers

ReImagining Women

Author : Shirley C. Neuman
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The eighteen essays in this collection largely draw on, extend, and often bring together four quit different, but nonetheless interrelated, thrusts of feminist criticism and theory in which representation is an issue.

Reimagining Christian Origins

Author : Elizabeth Anne Castelli
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Taking as inspiration the work of Burton L. Mack - upon whose sixty-fifth birthday, this volume is issued - Reimagining Christian Origins provides an introduction to and an analysis of the emerging methodologies of the field and presents nineteen new examples of scholars at work in this field.

Reimagining the American Pacific

Author : Rob Wilson
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In this compelling critique Rob Wilson explores the creation of the "Pacific Rim" in the American imagination and how the concept has been variously adapted and resisted in Hawai'i, the Pacific Islands, New Zealand, and Australia. Reimagining the American Pacific ranges from the nineteenth century to the present and draws on theories of postmodernism, transnationality, and post-Marxist geography to contribute to the ongoing discussion of what constitutes "global" and "local." Wilson begins by tracing the arrival of American commerce and culture in the Pacific through missionary and imperial forces in the nineteenth century and the parallel development of Asia/Pacific as an idea. Using an impressive range of texts--from works by Herman Melville, James Michener, Maori and Western Samoan novelists, and Bamboo Ridge poets to Baywatch, films and musicals such as South Pacific and Blue Hawaii, and native Hawaiian shark god poetry--Wilson illustrates what it means for a space to be "regionalized." Claiming that such places become more open to transnational flows of information, labor, finance, media, and global commodities, he explains how they then become isolated, their borders simultaneously crossed and fixed. In the case of Hawai'i, Wilson argues that culturally innovative, risky forms of symbol making and a broader--more global--vision of local plight are needed to counterbalance the racism and increasing imbalance of cultural capital and goods in the emerging postplantation and tourist-centered economy. Reimagining the American Pacific leaves the reader with a new understanding of the complex interactions of global and local economies and cultures in a region that, since the 1970s, has been a leading trading partner of the United States. It is an engaging and provocative contribution to the fields of Asian and American studies, as well as those of cultural studies and theory, literary criticism, and popular culture.

Reimagining Equality

Author : Anita Hill
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From the heroic lawyer who spoke out against Clarence Thomas in the historic confirmation hearings twenty years ago At the historic Clarence Thomas confirmation hearings, Anita Hill spoke out courageously about workplace sexual harassment. Now she turns to the topic of home. As our country reels from the subprime mortgage meltdown and the resulting devastation of so many families and communities, Hill takes us inside this “crisis of home” and exposes its deep roots in race and gender inequities, which continue to imperil every American’s ability to achieve the American Dream. In this period of recovery and its aftermath, what is at stake is the inclusive democracy the Constitution promises. The achievement of that ideal, Hill argues, depends on each American’s ability to secure a place that provides access to every opportunity our country offers. Building on the great strides of the women’s and civil rights movements, Hill presents concrete proposals that encourage us to broaden our thinking about home and to reimagine equality for America’s future.

The Englishman and Detroit

Author : John Gallagher
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As the recession slowly unfolded, Detroit's small business ecosystem had few real solutions. Randal Charlton was an advocate who pushed me to think bigger, to expand my relationships, and to embrace endless possibilities for renewal. During the worst of times, he was an assuring presence." -Carla Walker-Miller, Founder and CEO, Walker-Miller Energy Services

Yamasaki in Detroit

Author : John Gallagher
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Although his best-known project was the World Trade Center in New York City, Japanese American architect Minoru Yamasaki (1912–1986) worked to create moments of surprise, serenity, and delight in distinctive buildings around the world. In his adopted home of Detroit, where he lived and worked for the last half of his life, Yamasaki produced many important designs that range from public buildings to offices and private residences. In Yamasaki in Detroit: A Search for Serenity, author John Gallagher presents both a biography of Yamasaki—or Yama as he was known—and an examination of his working practices, with an emphasis on the architect’s search for a style that would express his artistic goals. Gallagher explores Yamasaki’s drive to craft tranquil spaces amid bustling cities while other modernists favored "glass box" designs. He connects Yamasaki’s design philosophy to tumultuous personal experiences, including the architect’s efforts to overcome poverty, racial discrimination, and his own inner demons. Yamasaki in Detroit surveys select projects spanning from the late 1940s to the end of Yamasaki's life, revealing the unique gardens, pools, plazas, skylight atriums, and other oases of respite in these buildings. Gallagher includes prominent works like the Michigan Consolidated Gas Building in downtown Detroit, Temple Beth-El in Bloomfield Township, and landmark buildings on the Wayne State University and College for Creative Studies campuses, as well as smaller medical clinics, office buildings, and private homes (including Yamasaki’s own residence). Gallagher consults Yamasaki’s own autobiographical writings, architects who worked with Yamasaki in his firm, and photography from several historic archives to give a full picture of the architect’s work and motivations. Both knowledgeable fans of modernist architecture and general readers will enjoy Yamasaki in Detroit.

Old Islam in Detroit

Author : Sally Howell
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Across North America, Islam is portrayed as a religion of immigrants, converts, and cultural outsiders. Yet Muslims have been part of American society for much longer than most people realize. This book documents the history of Islam in Detroit, a city that is home to several of the nation's oldest, most diverse Muslim communities. In the early 1900s, there were thousands of Muslims in Detroit. Most came from Eastern Europe, the Ottoman Empire, and British India. In 1921, they built the nation's first mosque in Highland Park. By the 1930s, new Islam-oriented social movements were taking root among African Americans in Detroit. By the 1950s, Albanians, Arabs, African Americans, and South Asians all had mosques and religious associations in the city, and they were confident that Islam could be, and had already become, an American religion. When immigration laws were liberalized in 1965, new immigrants and new African American converts rapidly became the majority of U.S. Muslims. For them, Detroit's old Muslims and their mosques seemed oddly Americanized, even unorthodox. Old Islam in Detroit explores the rise of Detroit's earliest Muslim communities. It documents the culture wars and doctrinal debates that ensued as these populations confronted Muslim newcomers who did not understand their manner of worship or the American identities they had created. Looking closely at this historical encounter, Old Islam in Detroit provides a new interpretation of the possibilities and limits of Muslim incorporation in American life. It shows how Islam has become American in the past and how the anxieties many new Muslim Americans and non-Muslims feel about the place of Islam in American society today are not inevitable, but are part of a dynamic process of political and religious change that is still unfolding.

Overthrowing Geography Re imagining Identities

Author : Mark Andrew Levine
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