Search results for: renaissance-ornament-prints-and-drawings

Renaissance Ornament Prints and Drawings

Author : Janet S. Byrne
File Size : 79.17 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 541
Read : 728
Download »

Renaissance Ornament Prints and Drawings

Author :
File Size : 48.59 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 844
Read : 1238
Download »

Renaissance Ornament Prints and Drawings

Author : Janet S. Byrne
File Size : 71.71 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 674
Read : 1284
Download »
By the sixteenth century designs for ornament were increasingly executed on paper as drawings or, more often, as prints. The designs in Renaissance Ornament Prints and Drawings provide a rich record of the sources of the period's ornament vocabulary, and, beyond this, a consideration of a number of documented examples of a single motif can reveal much to the art historian or interested casual viewer about the evolution of style. Some Renaissance ornament designs display motifs--many derived from Roman painting, sculpture, and architecture--that could be adapted for use in a variety of materials and spaces; other works show specific objects, whether copied or newly designed. During the Renaissance, it was common for designers to lend sketchbooks of their drawings to friends and students, and in this way ornament ideas traveled rapidly across Europe. Renaissance drawings appeared not only in sketchbooks, but also in deluxe presentations for patrons, such as the volumes of highly finished designs created by such a talented artist as Jacques Androuet Du Cerceau. At its best, Renaissance ornament design is a fresh, inventive drawing that solves old problems with distinction, but many interesting examples of sixteenth-century ornament design are the works of artisans who, though skilled as craftsmen, were not draftsmen. Ornament prints are even more numerous than ornament drawings. These prints, produced in response to the development of papermaking and printmaking techniques from the late fifteenth century onward, frequently served as patterns for artisans catering to the new merchant class. The rarest prints are those meant to be decorations themselves--few have survived because they were intended to be cut apart and pasted on walls, ceilings, boxes, books, musical instruments, and furniture. Patterns, too, were often destroyed by use. Beginning in the 1520s, pattern books of all sorts were published, offering designs for lettering, writing, and bookbinding; lace, embroidery, weaving, and tailoring; furniture, woodcarving, stonecutting, and ironwork; architectural framework and ornament; armor, goldsmithing, and jewelry; and vessels and utensils of every description. Allowed a good deal of freedom, Renaissance ornament designs frequently incorporated erotic images and emblems. Their splendid array of ornament motifs also includes satyrs, mermaids, and monsters, children, leaves, grotesques, masks, caryatids, cartouches, candelabra, trophies, and heads. The eclectic selection of designs in this volume reflects the richness of Renaissance life, fashion, and artistic crosscurrents. (This title was originally published in 1981/82.)

Ornament and Architecture

Author : Brown University. Department of Art
File Size : 50.83 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 812
Read : 463
Download »

Histories of Ornament

Author : Gülru Necipoğlu
File Size : 29.67 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 350
Read : 668
Download »

Ornament and Monstrosity in Early Modern Art

Author : Chris Hammeken
File Size : 79.97 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 259
Read : 768
Download »
Sixteenth-century art features a remarkable fascination with ornament, both as decorative device and compositional strategy, across artistic media and genres. Interestingly, the inventive, elegant manifestations of ornament in the art of the period often include layers of disquieting paradoxes, creating tensions - monstrosities even - that manifest themselves in a variety of ways. In some cases dichotomies (between order and chaos, artificiality and nature, rational logic and imaginative creativity, etc.) may emerge. Elsewhere, a sense of agitation undermines structures of statuesque control or erupts into wild, unruly displays of constant genesis. The monstrosity of ornament is brought into play through strategies of hybridity and metamorphosis, or by the handling of scale, proportion, and space in ambiguous and discomforting ways that break with the laws of physical reality. An interest in strange exaggeration and curious artifice allows for such colossal ornamental attitude to thrive within sixteenth-century art.

Ornament and Architecture

Author : Brown University, Department of Art Staff
File Size : 24.30 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 305
Read : 1017
Download »

French Architectural and Ornament Drawings of the Eighteenth Century

Author : Mary L. Myers
File Size : 38.62 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 816
Read : 614
Download »

The Art of Renaissance Europe

Author : Rebecca Arkenberg
File Size : 24.78 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 911
Read : 824
Download »

Encyclopedia of Interior Design

Author : Joanna Banham
File Size : 52.13 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 552
Read : 1293
Download »
First published in 1997. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Ornament

Author : T. L. J. Howard
File Size : 50.19 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 924
Read : 506
Download »
In a wide-ranging and richly illustrated book, the authors begin by tracing the ways ornament has been used over the last five centuries, the rules of decorum and etiquette associated with it, and the social, moral and spiritual values it has represented. They examine how architecture set the agenda for ornament in the Renaissance, and how printed images carried a common vocabulary of ornament throughout the Western world. They survey the personal side of ornament, both in dress and in the domestic interior - a private expression of the self and a public statement of social and cultural status. They look at ornament in the public domain - from the lavish decoration and symbolism of a town pageant to the logos of today's corporate industry - and show how the ever-evolving role of ornament is to invent and embody the collective spirit of communities at work and at leisure. They conclude by discussing how the Western tradition of ornament has responded to and absorbed 'exotic' African and Asian motifs: Moresque motifs of the Near East and such familiar designs as the 'Paisley' and Willow" patterns.

Engraving the Savage

Author : Michael Gaudio
File Size : 61.66 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 757
Read : 462
Download »
In 1585, the British painter and explorer John White created images of Carolina Algonquian Indians. These images were collected and engraved in 1590 by the Flemish publisher and printmaker Theodor de Bry and were reproduced widely, establishing the visual prototype of North American Indians for European and Euro-American readers. In this innovative analysis, Michael Gaudio explains how popular engravings of Native American Indians defined the nature of Western civilization by producing an image of its “savage other.” Going beyond the notion of the “savage” as an intellectual and ideological construct, Gaudio examines how the tools, materials, and techniques of copperplate engraving shaped Western responses to indigenous peoples. Engraving the Savage demonstrates that the early visual critics of the engravings attempted-without complete success-to open a comfortable space between their own “civil” image-making practices and the “savage” practices of Native Americans-such as tattooing, bodily ornamentation, picture-writing, and idol worship. The real significance of these ethnographic engravings, he contends, lies in the traces they leave of a struggle to create meaning from the image of the American Indian. The visual culture of engraving and what it shows, Gaudio reasons, is critical to grasping how America was first understood in the European imagination. His interpretations of de Bry’s engravings describe a deeply ambivalent pictorial space in between civil and savage-a space in which these two organizing concepts of Western culture are revealed in their making. Michael Gaudio is assistant professor of art history at the University of Minnesota.

Ornament and Architecture

Author :
File Size : 84.98 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 150
Read : 768
Download »

Roman Antiquities in Renaissance France 1515 65

Author : Richard Cooper
File Size : 52.75 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 935
Read : 1068
Download »
Making use of new and original material based on firsthand sources, this book interrogates the vogue for collecting, discussing, depicting, and putting to political and cultural use Roman antiquities in the French Renaissance. It surveys a range of activity from the labours of collectors and patrons to royal entries, considers attacks on the craze for the antique, and sets literary instances among a much wider spectrum of artistic endeavour. While Renaissance collecting and antiquarianism have certainly been the object of critical scrutiny, this study brings disparate fields into a single focus; and it examines not only areas of antiquarian expertise and interest (such as statues, coins, and books), but also important individual historical figures. The opening chapters deal with the role played in Rome by French ambassadors, who sent back antiques to collectors at court, who in the person of Jean Du Bellay, undertook excavations, and assembled a major personal collection, which was housed in a new villa in the ruined Baths of Diocletian. The volume includes a valuable appendix, which presents in transcription catalogues of the collections of Cardinal Jean du Bellay.

Tapestry in the Renaissance

Author : Thomas P. Campbell
File Size : 73.57 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 540
Read : 1101
Download »
Tapestries––the art form of kings––were a principal tool used by powerful Renaissance rulers to convey their wealth and might. From 1460 to 1560, courts and churches lavished vast sums on costly weavings in silk and gold thread from designs by leading artists. In this lavishly illustrated book, the first major survey of tapestry production of this period, contributors analyze some of these&beautiful tapestries, examine the stylistic and technical development of tapestry production in the Low Countries, France, and Italy during the Renaissance, and discuss the contribution that the medium made to art, liturgy, and propaganda of the day.

Ornament and Architecture Renaissance Drawings Prints and Books

Author : Janet Adams
File Size : 78.71 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 904
Read : 668
Download »

16th Century Italian Ornament Prints in the V A Museum

Author : Elizabeth E Miller
File Size : 27.20 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 804
Read : 635
Download »
An illustrated catalogue of the V&A's Italian ornament print collection. Included are detailed descriptions of the prints and all the reissues and direct copies published in later centuries. The illustrations are divided into pure ornament categories such as alphabets, cartouches, friezes, grotesques and trophies and there are also sections on applied ornament on vases, architecture, metalwork and textiles.

Heroic Armor of the Italian Renaissance

Author : Stuart W. Pyhrr
File Size : 23.39 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 472
Read : 328
Download »

Ornament and Architecture

Author :
File Size : 40.74 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 640
Read : 1259
Download »

Nuremberg a Renaissance City 1500 1618

Author : Jeffrey Chipps Smith
File Size : 61.14 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 988
Read : 779
Download »
Although renowned for the excellence of its medieval art, the German city of Nuremberg reached the height of its artistic brilliance during the Renaissance. Beginning its ascendancy during the late fifteenth century, by 1500 the city had blossomed into both Germany's preeminent artistic center and one of the foremost cultural centers in all of Europe. Nuremberg was the home of Albrecht Dürer, the greatest Northern Renaissance master, whose creative genius inspired two generations of German artists. However, Dürer was only one of a host of extraordinary painters, printmakers, sculptors, and goldsmiths working in the city. Georg Pencz, Hans and Barthel Beham, Hans Schäufelein, Jost Amman, and Hans Lautensack were among the most accomplished printmakers of the day. Veit Stoss, Adam Kraft, Peter Flötner, and the Vischer family dominated early sixteenth-century German sculpture. Goldsmith Wenzel Jamnitzer was rivaled only by Florentine master Benvenuto Cellini in his inventiveness and technical virtuosity. This remarkably comprehensive volume is the first English-language examination of Nuremberg at its creative peak. Following a mapping of the city's principal landmarks, Guy Fitch Lytle provides a compact historical background for Jeffrey Chipps Smith's detailed discussions of the city's social and artistic history. Smith examines the religious function of art before and during the Reformation to demonstrate the magnitude of the cultural transformations that resulted from the adoption of Lutheranism in 1525. He considers the early manifestations of humanism in Nuremberg and its influence on the art of Dürer and his contemporaries, and he reviews the central role of Dürer's pedagogical ideas and his workshop in the dissemination of Renaissance artistic concepts. Finally, Smith surveys the principal artists and stylistic trends in Nuremberg from 1500 to the outbreak of the Thirty Years War in 1618. Nuremberg: A Renaissance City, 1500-1618 is the permanent record of an exhibition organized by the Archer M. Huntington Art Gallery as part of the centennial celebration of the University of Texas at Austin. As such, it represents not only a thorough introduction to the cultural heritage of Nuremberg during its period of greatest glory but also a catalogue of the more than two hundred objects borrowed for the exhibition from public and private collections in the United States, Canada, and Germany. The catalogue contains biographical sketches of forty-five major artists of the period. Over three hundred illustrations depict the city and its most magnificent artistic treasures.