Search results for: resilience-in-ecology-and-urban-design

Resilience in Ecology and Urban Design

Author : S.T.A. Pickett
File Size : 78.47 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 926
Read : 771
Download »
The contributors to this volume propose strategies of urgent and vital importance that aim to make today’s urban environments more resilient. Resilience, the ability of complex systems to adapt to changing conditions, is a key frontier in ecological research and is especially relevant in creative urban design, as urban areas exemplify complex systems. With something approaching half of the world’s population now residing in coastal urban zones, many of which are vulnerable both to floods originating inland and rising sea levels, making urban areas more robust in the face of environmental threats must be a policy ambition of the highest priority. The complexity of urban areas results from their spatial heterogeneity, their intertwined material and energy fluxes, and the integration of social and natural processes. All of these features can be altered by intentional planning and design. The complex, integrated suite of urban structures and processes together affect the adaptive resilience of urban systems, but also presupposes that planners can intervene in positive ways. As examples accumulate of linkage between sustainability and building/landscape design, such as the Shanghai Chemical Industrial Park and Toronto’s Lower Don River area, this book unites the ideas, data, and insights of ecologists and related scientists with those of urban designers. It aims to integrate a formerly atomized dialog to help both disciplines promote urban resilience.

Resilience in Ecology and Urban Design

Author : S.T.A. Pickett
File Size : 85.33 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 158
Read : 404
Download »
The contributors to this volume propose strategies of urgent and vital importance that aim to make today’s urban environments more resilient. Resilience, the ability of complex systems to adapt to changing conditions, is a key frontier in ecological research and is especially relevant in creative urban design, as urban areas exemplify complex systems. With something approaching half of the world’s population now residing in coastal urban zones, many of which are vulnerable both to floods originating inland and rising sea levels, making urban areas more robust in the face of environmental threats must be a policy ambition of the highest priority. The complexity of urban areas results from their spatial heterogeneity, their intertwined material and energy fluxes, and the integration of social and natural processes. All of these features can be altered by intentional planning and design. The complex, integrated suite of urban structures and processes together affect the adaptive resilience of urban systems, but also presupposes that planners can intervene in positive ways. As examples accumulate of linkage between sustainability and building/landscape design, such as the Shanghai Chemical Industrial Park and Toronto’s Lower Don River area, this book unites the ideas, data, and insights of ecologists and related scientists with those of urban designers. It aims to integrate a formerly atomized dialog to help both disciplines promote urban resilience.

Resilience Oriented Urban Planning

Author : Yoshiki Yamagata
File Size : 73.23 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 719
Read : 548
Download »
This book explores key theoretical and empirical issues related to the development and implementation of planning strategies that can provide guidance on the transition to climate-compatible and low-carbon urban development. It especially focuses on integrating resilience thinking into the urban planning process, and explains how such an integration can contribute to reflecting the dynamic properties of cities and coping with the uncertainties inherent in future climate change projections. Some of the main questions addressed are: What are the innovative methods and processes needed to incorporate resilience thinking into urban planning? What are the characteristics of a resilient urban form and what are the challenges associated with integrating them into urban development? Also, how can the resilience of cities be measured and what are the main constituents of an urban resilience assessment framework? In addition to addressing these crucial questions, the book features several case studies from around the world, investigating methodologies, challenges, and opportunities for mainstreaming climate resilience in the theory and practice of urban planning. Featuring contributions by prominent researchers from around the world, the book offers a valuable resource for students, academics and practitioners alike.

Multisystemic Resilience

Author : Michael Ungar
File Size : 21.69 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 809
Read : 270
Download »
"Across diverse disciplines, the term resilience is appearing more and more often. However, while each discipline has developed theory and models to explain the resilience of the systems they study (e.g., a natural environment, a community post-disaster, the human mind, a computer network, or the economy), there is a lack of over-arching theory that describes: 1) whether the principles that underpin the resilience of one system are similar or different from the principles that govern resilience of other systems; 2) whether the resilience of one system affects the resilience of other co-occurring systems; and 3) whether a better understanding of resilience can inform the design of interventions, programs and policies that address "wicked" problems that are too complex to solve by changing one system at a time? In other words (and as only one example among many) are there similarities between how a person builds and sustains psychological resilience and how a forest, community or the business where he or she works remains successful and sustainable during periods of extreme adversity? Does psychological resilience in a human being influence the resilience of the forests (through a change in attitude towards conservation), community (through a healthy tolerance for differences) and businesses (by helping a workforce perform better) with which a person interacts? And finally, does this understanding of resilience help build better social and physical ecologies that support individual mental health, a sustainable environment and a successful economy at the same time?"--

Scientific Approach Principle for New Resilient Coastal Landscape Design

Author : Anahita Kianous
File Size : 72.34 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 241
Read : 230
Download »
Due to recent climate change, the character of environmental regional planning has shifted to address the anticipated extreme increases in sea level rise. As such, this project, based on existing scientific research/data, proposes a spatial, habitable landscape architectural solution as a model for flood mitigation for the East coastal edge. This proposal tests the potential for resilient coastal landscapes through a particular site located on Revere Beach, along with the New England coast in Massachusetts. The study demonstrates how through new public spaces designed to renew and protect the beach and the broader offshores, residents and visitors will be able to engage with this 21st Century, resilient beachfront. Also, residents and visitors will experience sophisticated efficient flood alleviation strategies during natural successive storm events. The inherent goal of this proposal is to create an innovative design intervention, which applies new principles of resiliency to the coastal landscape through a technical and cultural solution, and which can be a replicable model for global coastal edges elsewhere. Revitalizing Revere Beach, Ma is a case study to mitigate floods based on Bernoulli 's principle. This proposal projects an idea of connecting puddles with fissures a set of "Flute Channels", which is my innovation design approach to transfer water from coast to wetland behind it. It helps to lower down the sea level in high tides and sudden tides. Retrofitting Revere Beach as a case study for flood Mitigate with a New Resilient Coastal Landscape approach started to study the watershed of the East Coast that includes three parts of North, Mid-Atlantic, and South Atlantic. Each has a flow that moves up and then inward to the east, in a concave pattern precipitated scale toward the north caused by the velocity of currents. In compare to the Pacific coast, this figuration came to appears as the convex pattern as the currents also are affected differently based on the climate and the land used materials. The project focused on how to manipulate waves and the currents to preserve the land figuration and creates the natural coastal landscape. Geo Technical research and scientific data is the fundamental study that I got the benefit of understanding the exact waves motion, density, velocity of water and how the different type of currents affect the land shape. My project is translating the science into landscape architecture. Earth and ocean are not sustainable- they’re dynamic, they’re shifting, they’re changing the landscape and coast components; land-used material as such salty sand beaches and ripple effects of waves affect the land in different ways. My hypothesis idea of retrofitting coastal landscape backs to its natural creation, which will be a combination of four components of barrier islands, bay or lagoon, thumb-lands or forelands and wetlands. These four figurations are shaped based on different wave motions and currents. I discovered two scales of the solution. Short and long term phasing. For the long term, I suggested floating island, which I examined it by the different objects adding to the coral reef at the Revere Beach. Objective, found a missing part of coastal components, the floating islands. And, Flute Channel was innovative design approached by science data of Bernoulli’s principle. In this term, water transferred from coast to the wetlands behind it. The connected containers science data was a combination solution to this creation. Due to recent climate change, the character of environmental regional planning has shifted to address the anticipated extreme increases in sea level rise. As such, this project, based on existing scientific research/data, proposes a spatial, habitable landscape architectural solution as a model for flood mitigation for the East coastal edge. This proposal tests the potential for resilient coastal landscapes through a particular site located on Revere Beach, along with the New England coast in Massachusetts. The study demonstrates how through new public spaces designed to renew and protect the beach and the broader offshores, residents and visitors will be able to engage with this 21st Century, resilient beachfront. Also, residents and visitors will experience sophisticated efficient flood alleviation strategies during natural successive storm events. The inherent goal of this proposal is to create an innovative design intervention, which applies new principles of resiliency to the coastal landscape through a technical and cultural solution, and which can be a replicable model for global coastal edges elsewhere. Revitalizing Revere Beach, Ma is a case study to mitigate floods based on Bernoulli 's principle. This proposal projects an idea of connecting puddles with fissures a set of "Flute Channels", which is my innovation design approach to transfer water from coast to wetland behind it. It helps to lower down the sea level in high tides and sudden tides. Retrofitting Revere Beach as a case study for flood Mitigate with a New Resilient Coastal Landscape approach started to study the watershed of the East Coast that includes three parts of North, Mid-Atlantic, and South Atlantic. Each has a flow that moves up and then inward to the east, in a concave pattern precipitated scale toward the north caused by the velocity of currents. In compare to the Pacific coast, this figuration came to appears as the convex pattern as the currents also are affected differently based on the climate and the land used materials. The project focused on how to manipulate waves and the currents to preserve the land figuration and creates the natural coastal landscape. Geo Technical research and scientific data is the fundamental study that I got the benefit of understanding the exact waves motion, density, velocity of water and how the different type of currents affect the land shape. My project is translating the science into landscape architecture. Earth and ocean are not sustainable- they’re dynamic, they’re shifting, they’re changing the landscape and coast components; land-used material as such salty sand beaches and ripple effects of waves affect the land in different ways. My hypothesis idea of retrofitting coastal landscape backs to its natural creation, which will be a combination of four components of barrier islands, bay or lagoon, thumb-lands or forelands and wetlands. These four figurations are shaped based on different wave motions and currents. I discovered two scales of the solution. Short and long term phasing. For the long term, I suggested floating island, which I examined it by the different objects adding to the coral reef at the Revere Beach. Objective, found a missing part of coastal components, the floating islands. And, Flute Channel was innovative design approached by science data of Bernoulli’s principle. In this term, water transferred from coast to the wetlands behind it. The connected containers science data was a combination solution to this creation. Due to recent climate change, the character of environmental regional planning has shifted to address the anticipated extreme increases in sea level rise. As such, this project, based on existing scientific research/data, proposes a spatial, habitable landscape architectural solution as a model for flood mitigation for the East coastal edge. This proposal tests the potential for resilient coastal landscapes through a particular site located on Revere Beach, along with the New England coast in Massachusetts. The study demonstrates how through new public spaces designed to renew and protect the beach and the broader offshores, residents and visitors will be able to engage with this 21st Century, resilient beachfront. Also, residents and visitors will experience sophisticated efficient flood alleviation strategies during natural successive storm events. The inherent goal of this proposal is to create an innovative design intervention, which applies new principles of resiliency to the coastal landscape through a technical and cultural solution, and which can be a replicable model for global coastal edges elsewhere. Revitalizing Revere Beach, Ma is a case study to mitigate floods based on Bernoulli 's principle. This proposal projects an idea of connecting puddles with fissures a set of "Flute Channels", which is my innovation design approach to transfer water from coast to wetland behind it. It helps to lower down the sea level in high tides and sudden tides. Retrofitting Revere Beach as a case study for flood Mitigate with a New Resilient Coastal Landscape approach started to study the watershed of the East Coast that includes three parts of North, Mid-Atlantic, and South Atlantic. Each has a flow that moves up and then inward to the east, in a concave pattern precipitated scale toward the north caused by the velocity of currents. In compare to the Pacific coast, this figuration came to appears as the convex pattern as the currents also are affected differently based on the climate and the land used materials. The project focused on how to manipulate waves and the currents to preserve the land figuration and creates the natural coastal landscape. Geo Technical research and scientific data is the fundamental study that I got the benefit of understanding the exact waves motion, density, velocity of water and how the different type of currents affect the land shape. My project is translating the science into landscape architecture. Earth and ocean are not sustainable- they’re dynamic, they’re shifting, they’re changing the landscape and coast components; land-used material as such salty sand beaches and ripple effects of waves affect the land in different ways. My hypothesis idea of retrofitting coastal landscape backs to its natural creation, which will be a combination of four components of barrier islands, bay or lagoon, thumb-lands or forelands and wetlands. These four figurations are shaped based on different wave motions and currents. I discovered two scales of the solution. Short and long term phasing. For the long term, I suggested floating island, which I examined it by the different objects adding to the coral reef at the Revere Beach. Objective, found a missing part of coastal components, the floating islands. And, Flute Channel was innovative design approached by science data of Bernoulli’s principle. In this term, water transferred from coast to the wetlands behind it. The connected containers science data was a combination solution to this creation.Due to recent climate change, the character of environmental regional planning has shifted to address the anticipated extreme increases in sea level rise. As such, this project, based on existing scientific research/data, proposes a spatial, habitable landscape architectural solution as a model for flood mitigation for the East coastal edge. This proposal tests the potential for resilient coastal landscapes through a particular site located on Revere Beach, along with the New England coast in Massachusetts. The study demonstrates how through new public spaces designed to renew and protect the beach and the broader offshores, residents and visitors will be able to engage with this 21st Century, resilient beachfront. Also, residents and visitors will experience sophisticated efficient flood alleviation strategies during natural successive storm events. The inherent goal of this proposal is to create an innovative design intervention, which applies new principles of resiliency to the coastal landscape through a technical and cultural solution, and which can be a replicable model for global coastal edges elsewhere. Revitalizing Revere Beach, Ma is a case study to mitigate floods based on Bernoulli 's principle. This proposal projects an idea of connecting puddles with fissures a set of "Flute Channels", which is my innovation design approach to transfer water from coast to wetland behind it. It helps to lower down the sea level in high tides and sudden tides. Retrofitting Revere Beach as a case study for flood Mitigate with a New Resilient Coastal Landscape approach started to study the watershed of the East Coast that includes three parts of North, Mid-Atlantic, and South Atlantic. Each has a flow that moves up and then inward to the east, in a concave pattern precipitated scale toward the north caused by the velocity of currents. In compare to the Pacific coast, this figuration came to appears as the convex pattern as the currents also are affected differently based on the climate and the land used materials. The project focused on how to manipulate waves and the currents to preserve the land figuration and creates the natural coastal landscape. Geo Technical research and scientific data is the fundamental study that I got the benefit of understanding the exact waves motion, density, velocity of water and how the different type of currents affect the land shape. My project is translating the science into landscape architecture. Earth and ocean are not sustainable- they’re dynamic, they’re shifting, they’re changing the landscape and coast components; land-used material as such salty sand beaches and ripple effects of waves affect the land in different ways. My hypothesis idea of retrofitting coastal landscape backs to its natural creation, which will be a combination of four components of barrier islands, bay or lagoon, thumb-lands or forelands and wetlands. These four figurations are shaped based on different wave motions and currents. I discovered two scales of the solution. Short and long term phasing. For the long term, I suggested floating island, which I examined it by the different objects adding to the coral reef at the Revere Beach. Objective, found a missing part of coastal components, the floating islands. And, Flute Channel was innovative design approached by science data of Bernoulli’s principle. In this term, water transferred from coast to the wetlands behind it. The connected containers science data was a combination solution to this creation.

Masterplanning for Change

Author : Ombretta Romice
File Size : 32.51 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 274
Read : 700
Download »
Cities are under increased pressure to be resilient and resistant to the effects of climate change and rapid urbanisation. However, this idea has still not been fully integrated in to practice. This book presents a practical approach to masterplanning the city and its areas (existing and new) as urban environments for the 21st century, addressing the design of cities as complex adaptive systems.

ICSCEA 2021

Author : J. N. Reddy
File Size : 50.90 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 900
Read : 419
Download »
This book presents articles from the Second International Conference on Sustainable Civil Engineering and Architecture, held on 30 October 2021 in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. The conference brings together international experts from both academia and industry to share their knowledge, expertise, to facilitate collaboration and improve cooperation in the field. The book highlights the latest advances in sustainable architecture and civil engineering, covering topics such as offshore structures, structural engineering, construction materials, and architecture.

Resilience and Sustainability in Urban Africa

Author : Innocent Chirisa
File Size : 87.97 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 142
Read : 200
Download »
Resilience has become a very topical issue transcending many spheres and sectors of sustainable urban development. This book presents a resilience framework for sustainable cities and towns in Africa. The rise in informal settlements is due to the urban planning practices in most African cities that rarely reflect the realities of urban life and environment for urban development. Aspects of places, people and process are central to the concept of urban resilience and sustainable urban growth. It stems from the observation that urban vulnerability is on the increase in Zimbabwe and beyond. In history, disasters have adversely affected nations across the world, inflicting wide ranging losses on one hand while on the other hand creating development opportunities for urban communities. Cooperation in disaster management is a strategy for minimising losses and uplifting the affected urban settlements. The significance of urban planning and design in the growth and development of sustainable urban centres is well documented. Urbanisation has brought with it challenges that most developing countries such as Zimbabwe are not equipped to handle. This has been accompanied by problems such as overpopulation, overcrowding, shortages of resources and the growth of slum settlements. There need is to seriously consider urban planning and design in order to come up with contemporary designs that are resilient to current urban challenges. There are major gaps in urban resilience building for instance in Harare and the local authority needs to prioritise investment in resilient urban infrastructure.

Nature Place People Forging Connections Through Neighbourhood Landscape Design

Author : Puay-yok Tan
File Size : 80.15 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 179
Read : 543
Download »
Neighbourhood landscapes are the quintessential forms of urban landscapes in most cities worldwide. They are pervasive, and hence experienced by the large majority of urban dwellers in their everyday life. More than parks, nature reserves or nature areas which are visited as destinations, neighbourhood landscapes provide the most immediate, frequent and convenient form of nature experienced by urban dwellers on a daily basis. They are also valuable as social spaces to bring residents together, foster social ties, and strengthen communities. Despite their importance, surprisingly little has been written to guide the planning and design of neighbourhood landscapes.This book is written for a specific purpose, to illustrate how the design of neighbourhood landscapes helps to deliver more benefits for urban dwellers and, at the same time, protect ecosystems that facilitate human well-being. This is in turn important as the synergistic relationships between human well-being, quality of biophysical urban environment, and health of human-environment interactions fundamentally underpin urban sustainability. The authors emphasize the role neighbourhood landscapes play in forging connections between people and nature, people and people, and people and place. Most of all, the book highlights the role of focusing on people in this endeavour, as it is only when landscapes are appropriately designed, and when people recognize these benefits, that they become valued and protected as a community resource.This book is organized into two parts. Part 1 focuses on the conceptual foundations that underpin the neighbourhood landscape design guidelines being developed. In this section, the authors describe the key concepts relating functions of neighbourhood landscapes to the key urban development goals of sustainability, liveability and reliance; how they can be represented in a framework; and how a synthesis of current knowledge of cities as socio-ecological systems helps to identify principles that can guide the designing of neighbourhood landscapes. Part 2 is more application focused, and is centred on neighbourhood landscape design guidelines inspired by the concept of ecosystem services. The guidelines consist of design approaches, practical strategies, design targets and performance monitoring indicators for tracking the performance of neighbourhood landscapes. The book is written for readers in academia and design practice, and anyone who has a role in shaping neighbourhood landscapes for the benefit of urban dwellers.

Infrastructures and Social Complexity

Author : Penelope Harvey
File Size : 89.6 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 754
Read : 359
Download »
Contemporary forms of infrastructural development herald alternative futures through their incorporation of digital technologies, mobile capital, international politics and the promises and fears of enhanced connectivity. In tandem with increasing concerns about climate change and the anthropocene, there is further an urgency around contemporary infrastructural provision: a concern about its fragility, and an awareness that these connective, relational systems significantly shape both local and planetary futures in ways that we need to understand more clearly. Offering a rich set of empirically detailed and conceptually sophisticated studies of infrastructural systems and experiments, present and past, contributors to this volume address both the transformative potential of infrastructural systems and their stasis. Covering infrastructural figures; their ontologies, epistemologies, classifications and politics, and spanning development, urban, energy, environmental and information infrastructures, the chapters explore both the promises and failures of infrastructure. Tracing the experimental histories of a wide range of infrastructures and documenting their variable outcomes, the volume offers a unique set of analytical perspectives on contemporary infrastructural complications. These studies bring a systematic empirical and analytical attention to human worlds as they intersect with more-than-human worlds, whether technological or biological.