Search Results for "the-architecture-of-new-york-city"

The Architecture of New York City

The Architecture of New York City

Histories and Views of Important Structures, Sites, and Symbols

  • Author: Donald Martin Reynolds,Alastair Reynolds
  • Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Architecture
  • Page: 390
  • View: 4304
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From the reviews of the first edition of Architecture of New York City… "It should provide joy to anyone even vaguely interested in this city and its artifacts.… It is very likely to turn them into enthusiasts." —New York Times Book Review "…weaves the little-known stories of 80 buildings and landmarks into a colorful tapestry of New York’s whirlwind history.… This richly illustrated guide can be read from beginning to end with great pleasure." —Publishers Weekly "…Reynolds takes a new look at the older glories of New York. The architecture is freshly seen and is clearly researched. Reynolds’ splendid photographs present highly original views of familiar (and not so familiar) important structures and sites." —Adolph Placzek, former president of the Society of Architectural Historians The history of New York City is a rich pageant of culture, commerce, social change, and human drama stretching back five hundred years. And when we know where to look for it, it is all there for us to see, vividly etched into the cityscape. Now in this celebration of New York’s architecture, Donald Martin Reynolds helps us to see and appreciate, as never before, the city’s monuments and masterpieces, and to hear the tales they have to tell. With the help of nearly 200 striking photographs (20 of them new to this edition), Dr. Reynolds takes us on an unforgettable tour of five centuries of architectural change and innovation—from 16th-century Dutch canals and 18th-century farmhouses, to the elevator buildings of the 1870s (precursors of skyscrapers) and the Art Deco, Bauhaus, and Post-modern buildings that make up New York City’s celebrated skyline. Floor by floor stone by stone, detail by detail Dr. Reynolds lovingly describes 90 of the city’s most striking buildings, bridges, parks, and places. He tells us when, why, and how they were built and who built them, and in the process, he evokes the illustrious and exciting history of this restless, ceaselessly seductive metropolis.

AIA Guide to New York City

AIA Guide to New York City

  • Author: Norval White,Elliot Willensky,Fran Leadon
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN: 9780199772919
  • Category: Architecture
  • Page: 1088
  • View: 4166
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Hailed as "extraordinarily learned" (New York Times), "blithe in spirit and unerring in vision," (New York Magazine), and the "definitive record of New York's architectural heritage" (Municipal Art Society), Norval White and Elliot Willensky's book is an essential reference for everyone with an interest in architecture and those who simply want to know more about New York City. First published in 1968, the AIA Guide to New York City has long been the definitive guide to the city's architecture. Moving through all five boroughs, neighborhood by neighborhood, it offers the most complete overview of New York's significant places, past and present. The Fifth Edition continues to include places of historical importance--including extensive coverage of the World Trade Center site--while also taking full account of the construction boom of the past 10 years, a boom that has given rise to an unprecedented number of new buildings by such architects as Frank Gehry, Norman Foster, and Renzo Piano. All of the buildings included in the Fourth Edition have been revisited and re-photographed and much of the commentary has been re-written, and coverage of the outer boroughs--particularly Brooklyn--has been expanded. Famed skyscrapers and historic landmarks are detailed, but so, too, are firehouses, parks, churches, parking garages, monuments, and bridges. Boasting more than 3000 new photographs, 100 enhanced maps, and thousands of short and spirited entries, the guide is arranged geographically by borough, with each borough divided into sectors and then into neighborhood. Extensive commentaries describe the character of the divisions. Knowledgeable, playful, and beautifully illustrated, here is the ultimate guided tour of New York's architectural treasures. Acclaim for earlier editions of the AIA Guide to New York City: "An extraordinarily learned, personable exegesis of our metropolis. No other American or, for that matter, world city can boast so definitive a one-volume guide to its built environment." -- Philip Lopate, New York Times "Blithe in spirit and unerring in vision." -- New York Magazine "A definitive record of New York's architectural heritage... witty and helpful pocketful which serves as arbiter of architects, Baedeker for boulevardiers, catalog for the curious, primer for preservationists, and sourcebook to students. For all who seek to know of New York, it is here. No home should be without a copy." -- Municipal Art Society "There are two reasons the guide has entered the pantheon of New York books. One is its encyclopedic nature, and the other is its inimitable style--'smart, vivid, funny and opinionated' as the architectural historian Christopher Gray once summed it up in pithy W & W fashion." -- Constance Rosenblum, New York Times "A book for architectural gourmands and gastronomic gourmets." -- The Village Voice

The architecture of literacy

The architecture of literacy

the Carnegie libraries of New York City

  • Author: Mary B. Dierickx,New York (N.Y.). Dept. of General Services,Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art
  • Publisher: Urban Center Books
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
  • Page: 218
  • View: 2178
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Water-works

Water-works

The Architecture and Engineering of the New York City Water Supply

  • Author: Kevin Bone,Paul Deppe
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Architecture
  • Page: 268
  • View: 2006
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The fresh, clean taste of New York's water is legendary. Less well known is the fascinating story of the massive program of exploration and construction that was required to achieve such purity. The story of that monumental undertaking is told in Water-Works and illustrated with an astonishing archive of drawings and photographs documenting the design and construction of dams, reservoirs, aqueducts, and tunnels. This complex system brings millions of gallons of water to the city every day from rivers many hundreds of miles away. Kevin Bone, Gina Pollara, Paul Deppe, and students from the Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture of the Cooper Union spent nine years cataloging and preserving this remarkable archive, which is held by the City of New York Department of Environmental Protection. Essays by Bone, former DEP commissioner Albert F. Appleton, and scholars Peter H. Gleick and Gerard Koeppel trace the history of the system from its beginnings in the mid-1800s to the current construction of City Water Tunnel #3. The story of New York's water system is illuminated in expert detail on the pages of Water-Works, revealing the beauty and power of these magnificent works of public architecture and engineering.

The Architecture of Downtown Troy

The Architecture of Downtown Troy

An Illustrated History

  • Author: Diana S. Waite
  • Publisher: SUNY Press
  • ISBN: 1438474733
  • Category: History
  • Page: 224
  • View: 8050
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Tells the forgotten but surprising stories of the many handsome and significant buildings in downtown Troy, New York. Located about 150 miles north of Manhattan, on the east bank of the Hudson River, the city of Troy, New York, was once an industrial giant. It led the nation in iron production throughout much of the nineteenth century, and its factories turned out bells and cast-iron stoves that were sold the world over. Its population was both enterprising and civic-minded. Along with Troy’s economic success came the public, commercial, educational, residential, and religious buildings to prove it. Stores, banks, churches, firehouses, and schools, both modest and sophisticated, sprouted up in the latest architectural styles, creating a lively and fashionable downtown. Row houses and brownstones for the middle class and the wealthy rivaled those in Brooklyn and Manhattan. By the mid-twentieth century, however, Troy had dwindled in both prominence and population. Downtown stagnated, leaving building facades and interiors untouched, often for decades. A late-blooming urban-renewal program demolished many blocks of buildings, but preservationists fought back. Today, reinvestment is accelerating, and Troy now boasts what the New York Times has called “one of the most perfectly preserved nineteenth-century downtowns in the United States.” This book tells the stories behind the many handsome and significant buildings in downtown Troy and how they were designed and constructed—stories that have never been pulled together before. For the first time in generations, scores of Troy buildings are again linked with their architects, some local but others from out of town (the “starchitects” of their day) and even from Europe. In addition to numerous historic images, the book also includes contemporary photographs by local photographer Gary Gold. This book will inform, delight, and surprise readers, thereby helping to build an educated constituency for the preservation of an important American city. “Diana Waite has labored long to bring us the architectural history of Troy, which is said to have one of the most perfectly preserved downtowns in the United States. Great architects designed some of the city’s impressive buildings—Richard Upjohn, Leopold Eidlitz, Marcus T. Reynolds; but so did architects fairly early in their careers—such as George B. Post, who did the iconic flatiron Hall building on First Street, and the very visible Troy Savings Bank Music Hall. The book is also a wistful tour of the lost past—truly magnificent structures and sumptuous interiors that fell to the wrecking ball. And here are the stories behind major landmarks—such as the Approach staircase up to RPI (or down to Troy); the struggle to raise a monument at the center of the city to Troy’s fallen soldiers from three wars; and the complex installation of six major Tiffany windows in St. Paul’s Episcopal Church. The book is abundantly illustrated, with maps, and written in lively narrative style. Ms. Waite often quotes newspaper accounts of construction as it was happening, which vivifies her history.” — William Kennedy “Urban economist Edward L. Glaeser proclaims cities the triumph of humanity, both the ultimate expression of human culture and the engine that has propelled human progress. In this insightful and beautifully illustrated book, Diana Waite tells the story of one exceptional, mostly nineteenth-century example: Troy, New York. Troy is a rare gem, largely unspoiled by the forces that turned so many of America’s towns into wastelands of asphalt. As architects, planners, and policymakers struggle to define a twenty-first-century world that kicks the habits of our fossil-fuel-addicted modernity, that rediscovers how to make places for people, that builds strong communities, studying places like Troy takes on entirely new relevance. The Architecture of Downtown Troy paints a picture of the evolution of a historic town that provides valuable lessons for building the world of tomorrow.” — Carl Elefante, 2018 President, The American Institute of Architects “Diana Waite’s history of Troy’s downtown buildings describes the importance and diversity of this city’s distinctive architecture. Her clear narrative of Troy’s nineteenth-century growth, fires, early twentieth-century expansion, and its engagement of nationally recognized architects is excellent and supported by voluminous photographs. Troy is fortunate that twentieth-century ‘urban renewal’ occurred in a corner of the central business district, leaving intact so much of the city’s well-designed commercial, educational, and residential buildings. This new book presents an accurate, readable, and cohesive history of Troy. It is a must read.” — Matthew Bender IV “The pleasure of Troy isn’t discovering a single old building, but finding yourself lost among dozens of them. You may feel as if it were 1880, and you were strolling home to Washington Park, perhaps just for a change of collar.” — New York Times

The Architectural Guidebook to New York City

The Architectural Guidebook to New York City

  • Author: Francis Morrone,James Iska
  • Publisher: Gibbs Smith Publishers
  • ISBN: 9781586852115
  • Category: Architecture
  • Page: 422
  • View: 3857
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Francis Morrone has returned to the buildings of his original guidebook once again to detail additions and changes in name and usage, and the book has been modified to reflect post September 11th New York City. With its thoughtful detail and out-of-the-ordinary observations, this guidebook is a must-have for New Yorkers, tourists, and architectural lovers everywhere.

Guide to Contemporary New York City Architecture

Guide to Contemporary New York City Architecture

  • Author: John Hill
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
  • ISBN: 0393733262
  • Category: Architecture
  • Page: 304
  • View: 5313
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The city has been in the midst of a building boom since 2000, giving rise to a host of architecturally cutting edge residential, corporate, institutional, academic, and commercial structures. It's widely agreed that the building boom is now over, so what better time for a guidebook that maps them all out, literally. Featuring over 200 sites spanning the city's five boroughs, filled with color photos, detailed maps, subway and walking directions, and descriptions that highlight the most significant aspects of each, this guidebook is well-timed.

The Architecture of McKim, Mead, and White

The Architecture of McKim, Mead, and White

1879–1915

  • Author: Allan Greenberg,Michael George
  • Publisher: Architectural Book Publishing
  • ISBN: 1589798198
  • Category: Architecture
  • Page: 160
  • View: 9828
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For forty years (1880–1920), the now-legendary architectural firm led by Charles Follen McKim, William Rutherford Mead and Stanford White was responsible for many of the finest buildings in America. The Boston Public Library, Pennsylvania Station in New York, and the campus of Columbia University are among the national landmarks designed by these men and their partners, Bert Fenner and William Mitchell Kendall. This anthology of plans, elevations, and details of major works of McKim, Mead, and White is an invaluable reference source and inspiration for the student of architecture. As Allan Greenberg writes in his introduction: “The legacy of [McKim, Mead, and White] is so vast that . . . both its outer boundaries and its inner characteristics are only barely discernible. As architects of some of the most important buildings in the history of American architecture, the work of the office of McKim, Mead, and White reached a level of quality which has never been equaled by any large office before or after.” Charles Follen McKim cofounded the firm with William Rutherford Mead in 1878, along with his brother-in-law William B. Bigelow. One year later, Bigelow left the firm and was replaced by young Stanford White. Among the commissions that McKim worked on were the Villard Houses, the Boston Public Library, the Chicago World’s Fair Columbian Exposition and the Agriculture Building, the Columbia University campus, Symphony Hall in Boston, alterations to the White House, the Pierpont Morgan Library, Pennsylvania Station, and the University Club in New York. Stanford White, who, ironically, had replaced Charles McKim at the firm of Gambrill and Richardson in New York, joined the partnership in September 1879. A young, enthusiastic man who could “draw like a house afire,” in the words of McKim, White was responsible for many of the firm’s great architectural projects, including Madison Square Garden; the Washington Arch; the Judson Memorial Church; what is now Bronx Community College, and the accompanying Hall of Fame of Great Americans; the Tiffany Building, and the Gorham Building. His life and career ended abruptly at the age of fifty-three, when he was murdered on the roof of Madison Square Garden in a well-publicized shooting incident in 1906.

New York 1960

New York 1960

Architecture and Urbanism Between the Second World War and the Bicentennial

  • Author: Robert A. M. Stern,Thomas Mellins,David Fishman
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: 9781885254856
  • Category: Architecture
  • Page: 1374
  • View: 1521
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This is the third volume (and the fourth chronologically) in architect and historian Robert A. M. Stern's monumental series of documentary studies of New York City architecture and urbanism. New York 1880, New York 1900, and New York 1930 have comprehensively covered the architects and urban planners who defined New York from the end of the nineteenth century to the middle of the twentieth century. The post-World War II era witnessed New York's reign as the unofficial but undisputed economic and artistic capital of the world. By the mid-1970s, the city had experienced a profound reversal, and both its economy and its reputation were at a historic nadir. The architectural history of the period offered an exceptionally abundant and varied mix of building styles and types, from the faltering traditionalism of the 1940s through the heyday of International Style modernism in the 1950s and 1960s to the incipient postmodernism of the 1970s. Organized geographically, New York 1960 provides an encyclopedic survey of the city's postwar architecture as well as relating a coherent story about each of its diverse neighborhoods. Primary sources are emphasized, including the commentaries of the preeminent architecture critics of the day; the text is illustrated exclusively with a rich collection of period photographs.

The Architecture and Cities of Northern Mexico from Independence to the Present

The Architecture and Cities of Northern Mexico from Independence to the Present

  • Author: Edward Burian
  • Publisher: University of Texas Press
  • ISBN: 0292771908
  • Category: Architecture
  • Page: 350
  • View: 2005
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The states of Northern Mexico—Tamaulipas, Nuevo León, Coahuila, Chihuahua, Durango, Sonora, Sinaloa, and Baja California Norte and Sur—have architecture, urbanism, and landscape design that offer numerous lessons in how to build well, but this constructed environment is largely undervalued or unknown. To make this architecture better known to a wide professional, academic, and public audience, this book presents the first comprehensive overview in either English or Spanish of the architecture, urban landscapes, and cities of Northern Mexico from the country's emergence as a modern nation in 1821 to the present day. Profusely illustrated with color and black-and-white photographs, maps, and analytical drawings of urban cores of major cities, The Architecture and Cities of Northern Mexico systematically examines significant works of architecture in large cities and small towns in each state, from the earliest buildings in the urban core to the newest at the periphery. Edward R. Burian describes the most memorable works of architecture in each city in greater detail in terms of their spatial organization, materials, and sensory experience. He also includes a concise geographical and historical summary of the region that provides a useful background for the discussions of the works of architecture. Burian concludes the book with a brief commentary on lessons learned and possible futures for the architectural culture of the region, as well as the first comprehensive biographical listing of the architects practicing in Northern Mexico during the past two centuries.