Search Results for "the-craft-of-a-chinese-commentator"

Craft of a Chinese Commentator, The

Craft of a Chinese Commentator, The

Wang Bi on the Laozi

  • Author: Rudolf G. Wagner
  • Publisher: SUNY Press
  • ISBN: 0791493385
  • Category: History
  • Page: 372
  • View: 4597
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A systematic study of Wang Bi's (226-249) commentary on the Laozi, this book provides the first systematic study of a Chinese commentator's scholarly craft and introduces a highly sophisticated Chinese way of reading the Taoist classic, one that differs greatly from Western interpretations.

Yijing and Chinese Politics, The

Yijing and Chinese Politics, The

Classical Commentary and Literati Activism in the Northern Song Period, 960-1127

  • Author: Tze-ki Hon
  • Publisher: SUNY Press
  • ISBN: 0791484009
  • Category: Philosophy
  • Page: 231
  • View: 3593
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Discusses interpretations of the Yijing (the I Ching or Book of Changes) during the Northern Song period and how these illuminate the momentous changes in Chinese society during this era.

Ancient and Early Medieval Chinese Literature (vol.I)

Ancient and Early Medieval Chinese Literature (vol.I)

A Reference Guide, Part One

  • Author: David R. Knechtges,Taiping Chang
  • Publisher: BRILL
  • ISBN: 9004191275
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 791
  • View: 1762
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The long-awaited, first Western-language reference guide, this work offers a wealth of information on writers, genres, literary schools and terms of the Chinese literary tradition from earliest times to the seventh century C.E.

Ancient and Early Medieval Chinese Literature (vol. 2)

Ancient and Early Medieval Chinese Literature (vol. 2)

A Reference Guide, Part Two

  • Author: N.A
  • Publisher: BRILL
  • ISBN: 9004201645
  • Category: Literary Criticism
  • Page: 680
  • View: 1208
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The long-awaited, first Western-language reference guide, this work offers a wealth of information on writers, genres, literary schools and terms of the Chinese literary tradition from earliest times to the seventh century C.E.

Early Medieval China

Early Medieval China

A Sourcebook

  • Author: Wendy Swartz,Robert Ford Campany,Yang Lu,Jessey Choo
  • Publisher: Columbia University Press
  • ISBN: 0231531001
  • Category: History
  • Page: 832
  • View: 2216
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This innovative sourcebook builds a dynamic understanding of China's early medieval period (220–589) through an original selection and arrangement of literary, historical, religious, and critical texts. A tumultuous and formative era, these centuries saw the longest stretch of political fragmentation in China's imperial history, resulting in new ethnic configurations, the rise of powerful clans, and a pervasive divide between north and south. Deploying thematic categories, the editors sketch the period in a novel way for students and, by featuring many texts translated into English for the first time, recast the era for specialists. Thematic topics include regional definitions and tensions, governing mechanisms and social reality, ideas of self and other, relations with the unseen world, everyday life, and cultural concepts. Within each section, the editors and translators introduce the selected texts and provide critical commentary on their historical significance, along with suggestions for further reading and research.

Nothingness in Asian Philosophy

Nothingness in Asian Philosophy

  • Author: JeeLoo Liu,Douglas Berger
  • Publisher: Routledge
  • ISBN: 1317683846
  • Category: Philosophy
  • Page: 355
  • View: 6951
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A variety of crucial and still most relevant ideas about nothingness or emptiness have gained profound philosophical prominence in the history and development of a number of South and East Asian traditions—including in Buddhism, Daoism, Neo-Confucianism, Hinduism, Korean philosophy, and the Japanese Kyoto School. These traditions share the insight that in order to explain both the great mysteries and mundane facts about our experience, ideas of "nothingness" must play a primary role. This collection of essays brings together the work of twenty of the world’s prominent scholars of Hindu, Buddhist, Daoist, Neo-Confucian, Japanese and Korean thought to illuminate fascinating philosophical conceptualizations of "nothingness" in both classical and modern Asian traditions. The unique collection offers new work from accomplished scholars and provides a coherent, panoramic view of the most significant ways that "nothingness" plays crucial roles in Asian philosophy. It includes both traditional and contemporary formulations, sometimes putting Asian traditions into dialogue with one another and sometimes with classical and modern Western thought. The result is a book of immense value for students and researchers in Asian and comparative philosophy.

Shizi

Shizi

China's First Syncretist

  • Author: N.A
  • Publisher: Columbia University Press
  • ISBN: 0231504179
  • Category: Philosophy
  • Page: 240
  • View: 852
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By blending multiple strands of thought into one ideology, Chinese Syncretists of the pre-imperial period created an essential guide to contemporary ideas about self, society, and government. Merging traditions such as Ruism, Mohism, Daoism, Legalism, and Yin-Yang naturalism into their work, Syncretists created an integrated intellectual approach that contrasts with other, more specific philosophies. Presenting the first full English translation of the earliest example of a Syncretist text, this volume introduces Western scholars to both the brilliance of the syncretic method and a critical work of Chinese leadership. Written by Shi Jiao, China's first syncretic thinker, during the Warring States Period of 481 to 221 BCE, Shizi is similar to Machiavelli's The Prince in that it dispenses wisdom to would-be rulers. It stresses the need for leaders to be detached and objective. It further encourages self-cultivation and effective government, recommending that rulers maintain self-discipline, hire reliable people, delegate power transparently, and promote others in an orderly fashion. The people, it is argued, will emulate their leader's wisdom and virtue, and a just and peaceful state will result. Paul Fischer provides an extensive introduction and a chapter-by-chapter summary and analysis of the text—outlining the importance of syncretism in Chinese culture—and explores the text's particular features, authorship, transmission, loss, and reconstruction over time. The Shizi set the stage for a long history of syncretic endeavor in China, and its study provides insight into the vital traditions of early Chinese philosophy. It is also a template for interpreting other well-known works, such as the Confucian Analects, the Daoist Laozi, the Mohist Mozi, and the Legalist Shang jun shu.

Journal of Chinese Religions

Journal of Chinese Religions

  • Author: N.A
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: China
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 4438
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Sounds and Meanings

Sounds and Meanings

Early Chinese Historical Exegesis and Xu Guang's Shiji Yinyi

  • Author: Scott W. Galer
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category:
  • Page: 288
  • View: 5231
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China Review International

China Review International

  • Author: N.A
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: China
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 8321
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