Search Results for "the-market-revolution-jacksonian-america-1815-1846-jacksonian-america-1815-46"

The Market Revolution

The Market Revolution

Jacksonian America, 1815-1846

  • Author: Charles Sellers
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN: 0199762422
  • Category: History
  • Page: 512
  • View: 2169
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In The Market Revolution, one of America's most distinguished historians offers a major reinterpretation of a pivotal moment in United States history. Based on impeccable scholarship and written with grace and style, this volume provides a sweeping political and social history of the entire period from the diplomacy of John Quincy Adams to the birth of Mormonism under Joseph Smith, from Jackson's slaughter of the Indians in Georgia and Florida to the Depression of 1819, and from the growth of women's rights to the spread of the temperance movement. Equally important, he offers a provocative new way of looking at this crucial period, showing how the boom that followed the War of 1812 ignited a generational conflict over the republic's destiny, a struggle that changed America dramatically. Sellers stresses throughout that democracy was born in tension with capitalism, not as its natural political expression, and he shows how the massive national resistance to commercial interests ultimately rallied around Andrew Jackson. An unusually comprehensive blend of social, economic, political, religious, and cultural history, this accessible work provides a challenging analysis of this period, with important implications for the study of American history as a whole. It will revolutionize thinking about Jacksonian America.

The Market Revolution in America

The Market Revolution in America

Social, Political, and Religious Expressions, 1800-1880

  • Author: Melvyn Stokes,Stephen Conway
  • Publisher: University of Virginia Press
  • ISBN: 9780813916507
  • Category: Business & Economics
  • Page: 351
  • View: 8484
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This collection of essays by pre-eminent scholars in nineteenth-century history aims to respond to Charles Sellers' "The market revolution", reflecting upon the historiographic accomplishments initiated by his work, while at the same time advancing the argument across a range of fields.

McClellan's War

McClellan's War

  • Author: Ethan S. Rafuse
  • Publisher: Indiana University Press
  • ISBN: 0253006147
  • Category: History
  • Page: 545
  • View: 7469
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“An important book that rescues George B. McClellan’s military reputation.” —Chronicles Bold, brash, and full of ambition, George Brinton McClellan seemed destined for greatness when he assumed command of all the Union armies before he was 35. It was not to be. Ultimately deemed a failure on the battlefield by Abraham Lincoln, he was finally dismissed from command following the bloody battle of Antietam. To better understand this fascinating, however flawed, character, Ethan S. Rafuse considers the broad and complicated political climate of the earlier 19th Century. Rather than blaming McClellan for the Union’s military losses, Rafuse attempts to understand his political thinking as it affected his wartime strategy. As a result, Rafuse sheds light not only on McClellan’s conduct on the battlefields of 1861-62 but also on United States politics and culture in the years leading up to the Civil War. “Any historian seriously interested in the period will come away from the book with useful material and a better understanding of George B. McClellan.” —Journal of Southern History “Exhaustively researched and lucidly written, Rafuse has done an excellent job in giving us a different perspective on ‘Little Mac.’” —Civil War History “Rafuse’s thoughtful study of Little Mac shows just how enthralling this complex and flawed individual continues to be.” —Blue & Gray magazine

Brooks/Cole Empowerment Series: The Reluctant Welfare State

Brooks/Cole Empowerment Series: The Reluctant Welfare State

  • Author: Bruce S. Jansson
  • Publisher: Cengage Learning
  • ISBN: 1305177258
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 576
  • View: 4703
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Written in clear, lively prose by one of the foremost scholars of social welfare, this book analyzes the evolution of the American welfare state from colonial times to the present-placing social policy in its political, cultural, and societal context. Part of the BROOKS/COLE EMPOWERMENT SERIES, THE RELUCTANT WELFARE STATE, 8th Edition, aims to help students develop the core competencies and practice behaviors outlined in the 2008 Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards (EPAS) set by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE). Rather than passively reading about social welfare history, students are asked to interact with the issues, oppressed populations, ethical choices, social and ideological conflicts, advocates, and policies in preceding eras and in the contemporary period-analytically and ethically. The author examines how social welfare policy connects to an empowerment perspective, showing how vulnerable populations, as well as social reformers, have achieved progressive reforms through policy advocacy. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

The rise and fall of a frontier entrepreneur

The rise and fall of a frontier entrepreneur

Benjamin Rathbun, "Master Builder and Architectect"

  • Author: Roger Whitman,Scott G. Eberle,David A. Gerber
  • Publisher: Syracuse University Press
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 241
  • View: 6114
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This story of intrigue and scandal in the life of an early American businessman set during the raucous Jacksonian era brings to light a nearly forgotten tale of high-stakes intrigue, scandal, and financial ruin during a pivotal moment in the economic history of canaltown Buffalo and its western hinterland. Originally called Queen's Epic by the author, Roger Whitman's work probes beneath the surface of Benjamin Rathbun's startling career to reveal the unsettling social and economic forces that the American commercial revolution unleashed. When Rathbun's vast transportation, construction, and real estate empire finally collapsed under the weight of accumulated debt, shock waves rocked markets in the east. Amidst accusations of fraud, investors and currency speculators ran for cover in what soon became the nationwide Panic of 1837. After several decades of neglect, the manuscript was rediscovered and given a new title by editors Scott Eberle and David A. Gerber, who revived the book and shaped its historiographical context. The biography and history that emerges details a personal struggle to build stability, wealth, and rectitude in the shifting moral and economic sands of the Jacksonian era.

De Bow's Review

De Bow's Review

The Antebellum Vision of a New South

  • Author: John F. Kvach
  • Publisher: University Press of Kentucky
  • ISBN: 0813144213
  • Category: History
  • Page: 280
  • View: 566
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In the decades preceding the Civil War, the South struggled against widespread negative characterizations of its economy and society as it worked to match the North's infrastructure and level of development. Recognizing the need for regional reform, James Dunwoody Brownson (J. D. B.) De Bow began to publish a monthly journal -- De Bow's Review -- to guide Southerners toward a stronger, more diversified future. His periodical soon became a primary reference for planters and entrepreneurs in the Old South, promoting urban development and industrialization and advocating investment in schools, libraries, and other cultural resources. Later, however, De Bow began to use his journal to manipulate his readers' political views. Through inflammatory articles, he defended proslavery ideology, encouraged Southern nationalism, and promoted anti-Union sentiment, eventually becoming one of the South's most notorious fire-eaters. In De Bow's Review: The Antebellum Vision of a New South, author John Kvach explores how the editor's antebellum economic and social policies influenced Southern readers and created the framework for a postwar New South movement. By recreating subscription lists and examining the lives and livelihoods of 1,500 Review readers, Kvach demonstrates how De Bow's Review influenced a generation and a half of Southerners. This approach allows modern readers to understand the historical context of De Bow's editorial legacy. Ultimately, De Bow and his antebellum subscribers altered the future of their region by creating the vision of a New South long before the Civil War.

Gibbons v. Ogden, Law, and Society in the Early Republic

Gibbons v. Ogden, Law, and Society in the Early Republic

  • Author: Thomas H. Cox
  • Publisher: Ohio University Press
  • ISBN: 082144333X
  • Category: History
  • Page: 264
  • View: 626
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Gibbons v. Ogden, Law, and Society in the Early Republic examines a landmark decision in American jurisprudence, the first Supreme Court case to deal with the thorny legal issue of interstate commerce. Decided in 1824, Gibbons v. Ogden arose out of litigation between owners of rival steamboat lines over passenger and freight routes between the neighboring states of New York and New Jersey. But what began as a local dispute over the right to ferry the paying public from the New Jersey shore to New York City soon found its way into John Marshall’s court and constitutional history. The case is consistently ranked as one of the twenty most significant Supreme Court decisions and is still taught in constitutional law courses, cited in state and federal cases, and quoted in articles on constitutional, business, and technological history. Gibbons v. Ogden initially attracted enormous public attention because it involved the development of a new and sensational form of technology. To early Americans, steamboats were floating symbols of progress—cheaper and quicker transportation that could bring goods to market and refinement to the backcountry. A product of the rough-and-tumble world of nascent capitalism and legal innovation, the case became a landmark decision that established the supremacy of federal regulation of interstate trade, curtailed states’ rights, and promoted a national market economy. The case has been invoked by prohibitionists, New Dealers, civil rights activists, and social conservatives alike in debates over federal regulation of issues ranging from labor standards to gun control. This lively study fills in the social and political context in which the case was decided—the colorful and fascinating personalities, the entrepreneurial spirit of the early republic, and the technological breakthroughs that brought modernity to the masses.

America, History and Life

America, History and Life

  • Author: Eric H. Boehm
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: United States
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 7861
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Provides historical coverage of the United States and Canada from prehistory to the present. Includes information abstracted from over 2,000 journals published worldwide.

When Church Became Theatre

When Church Became Theatre

The Transformation of Evangelical Architecture and Worship in Nineteenth-Century America

  • Author: Jeanne Halgren Kilde
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN: 0199881723
  • Category: Architecture
  • Page: 328
  • View: 8046
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For nearly eighteen centuries, two fundamental spatial plans dominated Christian architecture: the basilica and the central plan. In the 1880s, however, profound socio-economic and technological changes in the United States contributed to the rejection of these traditions and the development of a radically new worship building, the auditorium church. When Church Became Theatre focuses on this radical shift in evangelical Protestant architecture and links it to changes in worship style and religious mission. The auditorium style, featuring a prominent stage from which rows of pews radiated up a sloping floor, was derived directly from the theatre, an unusual source for religious architecture but one with a similar goal-to gather large groups within range of a speaker's voice. Theatrical elements were prominent; many featured proscenium arches, marquee lighting, theatre seats, and even opera boxes. Examining these churches and the discussions surrounding their development, Jeanne Halgren Kilde focuses on how these buildings helped congregations negotiate supernatural, social, and personal power. These worship spaces underscored performative and entertainment aspects of the service and in so doing transformed relationships between clergy and audiences. In auditorium churches, the congregants' personal and social power derived as much from consumerism as from piety, and clerical power lay in dramatic expertise rather than connections to social institutions. By erecting these buildings, argues Kilde, middle class religious audiences demonstrated the move toward a consumer-oriented model of religious participation that gave them unprecedented influence over the worship experience and church mission.

Just the Facts

Just the Facts

How "Objectivity" Came to Define American Journalism

  • Author: David T.Z. Mindich
  • Publisher: NYU Press
  • ISBN: 0814764150
  • Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
  • Page: 200
  • View: 1301
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If American journalism were a religion, as it has been called, then its supreme deity would be "objectivity." The high priests of the profession worship the concept, while the iconoclasts of advocacy journalism, new journalism, and cyberjournalism consider objectivity a golden calf. Meanwhile, a groundswell of tabloids and talk shows and the increasing infringement of market concerns make a renewed discussion of the validity, possibility, and aim of objectivity a crucial pursuit. Despite its position as the orbital sun of journalistic ethics, objectivity—until now—has had no historian. David T. Z. Mindich reaches back to the nineteenth century to recover the lost history and meaning of this central tenet of American journalism. His book draws on high profile cases, showing the degree to which journalism and its evolving commitment to objectivity altered–and in some cases limited—the public's understanding of events and issues. Mindich devotes each chapter to a particular component of this ethic–detachment, nonpartisanship, the inverted pyramid style, facticity, and balance. Through this combination of history and cultural criticism, Mindich provides a profound meditation on the structure, promise, and limits of objectivity in the age of cybermedia.