Search results for: the-medieval-mystical-tradition-in-england-v-5

The Medieval Mystical Tradition in England

Author : Exeter Symposium
File Size : 58.7 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 442
Read : 696
Download »
Twelve papers focus on mysticism as an experience and on the work of individual mystics.

The Medieval Mystical Tradition in England

Author : Marion Glasscoe
File Size : 72.82 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 518
Read : 842
Download »
No description available.

The Medieval Mystical Tradition in England

Author : Edward Alexander Jones
File Size : 21.89 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 945
Read : 1114
Download »
No description available.

Mystical Theology and Continental Philosophy

Author : David Lewin
File Size : 61.2 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 651
Read : 411
Download »
Exploration of the interface between mystical theology and continental philosophy is a defining feature of the current intellectual and even devotional climate. But to what extent and in what depth are these disciplines actually speaking to one another; or even speaking about the same phenomena? This book draws together original contributions by leading and emerging international scholars, delineating emerging debates in this growing and dynamic field of research, and spanning mystical and philosophical traditions from the ancient, to the medieval, modern, and contemporary. At the heart of which lies Meister Eckhart, perhaps the single most influential Christian mystic for modern times. The book is organised around significant historical and contemporary figures who speak across the intersections of philosophy and theology, offering new insights into key interlocutors such as Pseudo-Dionysius, Augustine, Isaac Luria, Eckhart, Hegel, Heidegger, Marion, Kierkegaard, Deleuze, Laruelle, and Žižek. Designed both to contribute to current trends in mystical theology and philosophy, and elicit dialogue and debate from further afield, this book speaks within an emerging space exploring the retrieval of the mystical within a post-secular context.

The Medieval Mystical Tradition in England

Author : Exeter Symposium (2004 : Charney Manor)
File Size : 37.28 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 326
Read : 1183
Download »
The regular meetings resumed, here with particular focus on Julian of Norwich, and Syon Abbey and the Bridgettines.

Manuscript Culture and Medieval Devotional Traditions

Author : Jennifer N. Brown
File Size : 48.53 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 142
Read : 978
Download »
Essays exploring the great religious and devotional works of the Middle Ages in their manuscript and other contexts.

The Visual Object of Desire in Late Medieval England

Author : Sarah Stanbury
File Size : 60.4 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 775
Read : 313
Download »
Little remains of the rich visual culture of late medieval English piety. The century and a half leading up to the Reformation had seen an unparalleled growth of devotional arts, as chapels, parish churches, and cathedrals came to be filled with images in stone, wood, alabaster, glass, embroidery, and paint of newly personalized saints, angels, and the Holy Family. But much of this fell victim to the Royal Injunctions of September 1538, when parish officials were ordered to remove images from their churches. In this highly insightful book Sarah Stanbury explores the lost traffic in images in late medieval England and its impact on contemporary authors and artists. For Chaucer, Nicholas Love, and Margery Kempe, the image debate provides an urgent language for exploring the demands of a material devotional culture—though these writers by no means agree on the ethics of those demands. The chronicler Henry Knighton invoked a statue of St. Katherine to illustrate a lurid story about image-breaking Lollards. Later John Capgrave wrote a long Katherine legend that comments, through the drama of a saint in action, on the powers and uses of religious images. As Stanbury contends, England in the late Middle Ages was keenly attuned to and troubled by its "culture of the spectacle," whether this spectacle took the form of a newly made queen in Chaucer's Clerk's Tale or of the animate Christ in Norwich Cathedral's Despenser Retable. In picturing images and icons, these texts were responding to reformist controversies as well as to the social and economic demands of things themselves, the provocative objects that made up the fabric of ritual life.

A Companion to Middle English Prose

Author : Anthony Stockwell Garfield Edwards
File Size : 46.77 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 270
Read : 1096
Download »
Survey of and guide to all the major authors and genres in Middle English prose.

Saint Bride and Her Book

Author : Saint Birgitta (of Sweden)
File Size : 42.27 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 314
Read : 868
Download »
First published in 1992.

Mystical Languages of Unsaying

Author : Michael A. Sells
File Size : 58.37 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 983
Read : 598
Download »
The subject of Mystical Languages of Unsaying is an important but neglected mode of mystical discourse, apophasis. which literally means "speaking away." Sometimes translated as "negative theology," apophatic discourse embraces the impossibility of naming something that is ineffable by continually turning back upon its own propositions and names. In this close study of apophasis in Greek, Christian, and Islamic texts, Michael Sells offers a sustained, critical account of how apophatic language works, the conventions, logic, and paradoxes it employs, and the dilemmas encountered in any attempt to analyze it. This book includes readings of the most rigorously apophatic texts of Plotinus, John the Scot Eriugena, Ibn Arabi, Marguerite Porete, and Meister Eckhart, with comparative reference to important apophatic writers in the Jewish tradition, such as Abraham Abulafia and Moses de Leon. Sells reveals essential common features in the writings of these authors, despite their wide-ranging differences in era, tradition, and theology. By showing how apophasis works as a mode of discourse rather than as a negative theology, this work opens a rich heritage to reevaluation. Sells demonstrates that the more radical claims of apophatic writers—claims that critics have often dismissed as hyperbolic or condemned as pantheistic or nihilistic—are vital to an adequate account of the mystical languages of unsaying. This work also has important implications for the relationship of classical apophasis to contemporary languages of the unsayable. Sells challenges many widely circulated characterizations of apophasis among deconstructionists as well as a number of common notions about medieval thought and gender relations in medieval mysticism.