Search Results for "the-politics-of-authoritarian-rule-cambridge-studies-in-comparative-politics"

The Politics of Authoritarian Rule

The Politics of Authoritarian Rule

  • Author: Milan W. Svolik
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN: 110702479X
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 228
  • View: 5138
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"What drives politics in dictatorships? Milan W. Svolik argues authoritarian regimes must resolve two fundamental conflicts. Dictators face threats from the masses over which they rule - the problem of authoritarian control. Secondly from the elites with whom dictators rule - the problem of authoritarian power-sharing. Using the tools of game theory, Svolik explains why some dictators establish personal autocracy and stay in power for decades; why elsewhere leadership changes are regular and institutionalized, as in contemporary China; why some dictatorships are ruled by soldiers, as Uganda was under Idi Amin; why many authoritarian regimes, such as PRI-era Mexico, maintain regime-sanctioned political parties; and why a country's authoritarian past casts a long shadow over its prospects for democracy, as the unfolding events of the Arab Spring reveal. Svolik complements these and other historical case studies with the statistical analysis on institutions, leaders and ruling coalitions across dictatorships from 1946 to 2008"--

Rule by Law

Rule by Law

The Politics of Courts in Authoritarian Regimes

  • Author: Tom Ginsburg,Tamir Moustafa
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN: 1139473131
  • Category: Law
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 4183
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Scholars have generally assumed that courts in authoritarian states are pawns of their regimes, upholding the interests of governing elites and frustrating the efforts of their opponents. As a result, nearly all studies in comparative judicial politics have focused on democratic and democratizing countries. This volume brings together leading scholars in comparative judicial politics to consider the causes and consequences of judicial empowerment in authoritarian states. It demonstrates the wide range of governance tasks that courts perform, as well as the way in which courts can serve as critical sites of contention both among the ruling elite and between regimes and their citizens. Drawing on empirical and theoretical insights from every major region of the world, this volume advances our understanding of judicial politics in authoritarian regimes.

Tying the Autocrat's Hands

Tying the Autocrat's Hands

  • Author: Yuhua Wang
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN: 1107071747
  • Category: Law
  • Page: 216
  • View: 8298
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Tying the Autocrat's Hands provides a comprehensive, empirical evaluation of legal reforms in contemporary China. Based on the author's extensive fieldwork and analyses of original data, the book tells a story in which foreign investors with weak political connections push for judicial empowerment in China, while Chinese investors struggle to hold on to their privileges.

Ordering Power

Ordering Power

Contentious Politics and Authoritarian Leviathans in Southeast Asia

  • Author: Dan Slater
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN: 1139489968
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 3549
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Like the postcolonial world more generally, Southeast Asia exhibits tremendous variation in state capacity and authoritarian durability. Ordering Power draws on theoretical insights dating back to Thomas Hobbes to develop a unified framework for explaining both of these political outcomes. States are especially strong and dictatorships especially durable when they have their origins in 'protection pacts': broad elite coalitions unified by shared support for heightened state power and tightened authoritarian controls as bulwarks against especially threatening and challenging types of contentious politics. These coalitions provide the elite collective action underpinning strong states, robust ruling parties, cohesive militaries, and durable authoritarian regimes - all at the same time. Comparative-historical analysis of seven Southeast Asian countries (Burma, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, South Vietnam, and Thailand) reveals that subtly divergent patterns of contentious politics after World War II provide the best explanation for the dramatic divergence in Southeast Asia's contemporary states and regimes.

Religion and Authoritarianism

Religion and Authoritarianism

Cooperation, Conflict, and the Consequences

  • Author: Karrie J. Koesel
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN: 1107037069
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: 242
  • View: 1950
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This book examines the political consequences of growing religiosity in countries where politics are repressive and religious freedoms are in flux. The study compares how two authoritarian regimes - Russia and China - manage religion and how religious communities navigate restrictive political environments to pursue their own spiritual and economic interests.

Competitive Authoritarianism

Competitive Authoritarianism

Hybrid Regimes after the Cold War

  • Author: Steven Levitsky,Lucan A. Way
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN: 1139491482
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 8891
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Based on a detailed study of 35 cases in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and post-communist Eurasia, this book explores the fate of competitive authoritarian regimes between 1990 and 2008. It finds that where social, economic, and technocratic ties to the West were extensive, as in Eastern Europe and the Americas, the external cost of abuse led incumbents to cede power rather than crack down, which led to democratization. Where ties to the West were limited, external democratizing pressure was weaker and countries rarely democratized. In these cases, regime outcomes hinged on the character of state and ruling party organizations. Where incumbents possessed developed and cohesive coercive party structures, they could thwart opposition challenges, and competitive authoritarian regimes survived; where incumbents lacked such organizational tools, regimes were unstable but rarely democratized.

Democracy and Redistribution

Democracy and Redistribution

  • Author: Carles Boix,Carles
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN: 9780521532679
  • Category: History
  • Page: 264
  • View: 7819
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In this 2003 book, Boix offers a complete theory of political transitions.

Authoritarianism in an Age of Democratization

Authoritarianism in an Age of Democratization

  • Author: Jason Brownlee
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN: 1139464469
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 6734
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Far from sweeping the globe uniformly, the 'third wave of democratization' left burgeoning republics and resilient dictatorships in its wake. Applying more than a year of original fieldwork in Egypt, Iran, Malaysia, and the Philippines, in this book Jason Brownlee shows that the mixed record of recent democratization is best deciphered through a historical and institutional approach to authoritarian rule. Exposing the internal organizations that structure elite conflict, Brownlee demonstrates why the critical soft-liners needed for democratic transitions have been dormant in Egypt and Malaysia but outspoken in Iran and the Philippines. By establishing how ruling parties originated and why they impede change, Brownlee illuminates the problem of contemporary authoritarianism and informs the promotion of durable democracy.

The Politics of Protest in Hybrid Regimes

The Politics of Protest in Hybrid Regimes

Managing Dissent in Post-Communist Russia

  • Author: Graeme B. Robertson
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN: 1139491865
  • Category: Political Science
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 9236
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Since the end of the Cold War, more and more countries feature political regimes that are neither liberal democracies nor closed authoritarian systems. Most research on these hybrid regimes focuses on how elites manipulate elections to stay in office, but in places as diverse as Bolivia, Georgia, Kyrgyzstan, Serbia, Thailand, Ukraine and Venezuela, protest in the streets has been at least as important as elections in bringing about political change. The Politics of Protest in Hybrid Regimes builds on previously unpublished data and extensive fieldwork in Russia to show how one high-profile hybrid regime manages political competition in the workplace and in the streets. More generally, the book develops a theory of how the nature of organizations in society, state strategies for mobilizing supporters, and elite competition shape political protest in hybrid regimes.

Constitutions in Authoritarian Regimes

Constitutions in Authoritarian Regimes

  • Author: Tom Ginsburg,Alberto Simpser
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN: 1107047668
  • Category: Law
  • Page: 282
  • View: 7603
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This volume explores the form and function of constitutions in countries without the fully articulated institutions of limited government.