Search Results for "vanishing-ireland"

Vanishing Ireland

Vanishing Ireland

Friendship and Community

  • Author: James Fennell,Turtle Bunbury
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: 9781444733068
  • Category: Biography & Autobiography
  • Page: 292
  • View: 4663
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In their years travelling the Irish countryside, award-winning photographer James Fennell and author and historian Turtle Bunbury are constantly struck by the importance of friendship and community in the lives of the people they meet. Here, in Vanishing Ireland: Friendship and Community, they take to the roads of Ireland once again and, through stunning photographs and poignant interviews, bring us the stories, friendships and memories that form the identity of our nation. From sea-swept Ballinskelligs where the traditions of music and storytelling have passed through generations, to the quiet calm of a group of Cistercian monks, we are reminded of a time when kinship and friendship formed the lifeblood of every community; a time before social media and mobile phones, where communicating with a neighbour meant a chat over a cup of tea, on a country lane or over a garden wall. Through times of adversity and prosperity, the bonds of community between people - family, friends and neighbours - has remained a vital part of Irish life. Vanishing Ireland: Friendship and Community celebrates these bonds and reminds us of what it means to be Irish.

Vanishing Ireland

Vanishing Ireland

Further Chronicles of a Disappearing World

  • Author: James Fennell,Turtle Bunbury
  • Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton
  • ISBN: 9780340920275
  • Category: History
  • Page: 180
  • View: 9747
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In Vanishing Ireland II, the follow up to the bestselling Vanishing Ireland I, we take another journey down memory lane and, through a unique collection of portrait interviews, we look at the dying ways and traditions of Irish life. Illustrated with over a hundred evocative and stunning photographs, we meet the people and the customs that are fast becoming a distant memory. Through their own words and memories, men and women from every corner of Ireland transport us back to a simpler time when people lived off the land and the sea, and when music and storytelling were essential parts of life. Vanishing Ireland brings together the stories of those who lived through Ireland's formative years. These poignant interviews and photographs will make you laugh and cry but, above all, will provide a valuable chronicle that connects twenty-first century Ireland to a rapidly disappearing world.

The Vanishing Irish

The Vanishing Irish

Households, Migration, and the Rural Economy in Ireland, 1850-1914

  • Author: Timothy W. Guinnane
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • ISBN: 1400879825
  • Category: Business & Economics
  • Page: 358
  • View: 4117
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In the years between the Great Famine of the 1840s and the First World War, Ireland experienced a drastic drop in population: the percentage of adults who never married soared from 10 percent to 25 percent, while the overall population decreased by one third. What accounted for this? For many social analysts, the history of post-Famine Irish depopulation was a Malthusian morality tale where declining living standards led young people to postpone marriage out of concern for their ability to support a family. The problem here, argues Timothy Guinnane, is that living standards in post-Famine Ireland did not decline. Rather, other, more subtle economic changes influenced the decision to delay marriage or not marry at all. In this engaging inquiry into the "vanishing Irish," Guinnane explores the options that presented themselves to Ireland's younger generations, taking into account household structure, inheritance, religion, cultural influences on marriage and family life, and especially emigration. Guinnane focuses on rural Ireland, where the population changes were most profound, and explores the way the demographic patterns reflect the rural Irish economy, Ireland’s place as a small part in a much larger English-speaking world, and the influence of earlier Irish history and culture. Particular effort is made to compare Irish demographic behavior to similar patterns elsewhere in Europe, revealing an Ireland anchored in European tradition and yet a distinctive society in its own right. Originally published in 1997. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

The vanishing Irish

The vanishing Irish

the enigma of the modern world

  • Author: John Anthony O'Brien
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Family
  • Page: 258
  • View: 8086
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The Irish; Emigration, Marriage, and Fertility

The Irish; Emigration, Marriage, and Fertility

  • Author: Robert E. Kennedy
  • Publisher: Univ of California Press
  • ISBN: 9780520019874
  • Category: Ireland
  • Page: 236
  • View: 6151
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"While all other European nations increased in population during the [nineteenth] century, the population of Ireland decreased at every census except one between 1841 and 1961; the number of persons living in Ireland in 1966 was less than half that of 1841. Of all Western European countries, Ireland has the greatest amount of postponed marriage and permanent celibacy, and yet it also has the highest marital fertility rate... It is unsettling to social scientists to admit the existence of an apparent exception to so many well known and widely accepted theories concerning population growth, urbanization, emigration, age and marriage, and family size. The aim of this book is to distinguish some of the more interesting elements of Irish life which are indeed peculiar to Ireland from those which Ireland shares, to a greater or lesser degree, with other countries"--

Ireland, Migration and Return Migration

Ireland, Migration and Return Migration

The "Returned Yank" in the Cultural Imagination, 1952 to present

  • Author: Sinéad Moynihan
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN: 1786949709
  • Category: History
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 9113
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Drawing on historical, literary and cultural studies perspectives, this book examines the phenomenon of the "Returned Yank" in the cultural imagination, taking as its point of departure the most exhaustively discussed Returned Yank narrative, The Quiet Man (dir. John Ford, 1952). Often dismissed as a figure that embodies the sentimentality and nostalgia of Irish America writ large, this study argues that the Returned Yank's role in the Irish cultural imagination is much more varied and complex than this simplistic construction allows. Throughout the twentieth century and into the twenty-first, s/he has been widely discussed in broadcast and print media, and depicted in plays, novels, short stories and films. The imagined figure of the Returned Yank has been the driving impetus behind some of Ireland's most well-known touristic endeavours and festivals. In the form of U.S. Presidential visits, s/he has repeatedly been the catalyst for questions surrounding Irish identity. Most significantly, s/he has been mobilised as an arbiter in one of the most important debates in post-Independence Ireland: should Ireland remain a "traditional" society or should it seek to modernise? His/her repeated appearances in Irish literature and culture after 1952 - in remarkably heterogeneous, often very sophisticated ways - refute claims of the "aesthetic caution" of Irish writers, dramatists and filmmakers responding to the tradition/modernity debate.

The American Irish

The American Irish

A History

  • Author: Kevin Kenny
  • Publisher: Routledge
  • ISBN: 1317889169
  • Category: History
  • Page: 358
  • View: 471
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The American Irish: A History, is the first concise, general history of its subject in a generation. It provides a long-overdue synthesis of Irish-American history from the beginnings of emigration in the early eighteenth century to the present day. While most previous accounts of the subject have concentrated on the nineteenth century, and especially the period from the famine (1840s) to Irish independence (1920s), The American Irish: A History incorporates the Ulster Protestant emigration of the eighteenth century and is the first book to include extensive coverage of the twentieth century. Drawing on the most innovative scholarship from both sides of the Atlantic in the last generation, the book offers an extended analysis of the conditions in Ireland that led to mass migration and examines the Irish immigrant experience in the United States in terms of arrival and settlement, social mobility and assimilation, labor, race, gender, politics, and nationalism. It is ideal for courses on Irish history, Irish-American history, and the history of American immigration more generally.

The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish History

The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish History

  • Author: Alvin Jackson
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford
  • ISBN: 0191667609
  • Category: History
  • Page: 640
  • View: 8151
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The study of Irish history, once riven and constricted, has recently enjoyed a resurgence, with new practitioners, new approaches, and new methods of investigation. The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish History represents the diversity of this emerging talent and achievement by bringing together 36 leading scholars of modern Ireland and embracing 400 years of Irish history, uniting early and late modernists as well as contemporary historians. The Handbook offers a set of scholarly perspectives drawn from numerous disciplines, including history, political science, literature, geography, and the Irish language. It looks at the Irish at home as well as in their migrant and diasporic communities. The Handbook combines sets of wide thematic and interpretative essays, with more detailed investigations of particular periods. Each of the contributors offers a summation of the state of scholarship within their subject area, linking their own research insights with assessments of future directions within the discipline. In its breadth and depth and diversity, The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish History offers an authoritative and vibrant portrayal of the history of modern Ireland.

Ireland, 1912-1985

Ireland, 1912-1985

Politics and Society

  • Author: Joseph J. Lee,Joseph L. Lee
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN: 9780521266482
  • Category: History
  • Page: 754
  • View: 3315
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Assessing the relative importance of British influence and of indigenous impulses in shaping an independent Ireland, this book identifies the relationship between personality and process in determining Irish history.

1847

1847

A Chronicle of Genius, Generosity & Savagery

  • Author: Turtle Bunbury
  • Publisher: Gill & Macmillan Ltd
  • ISBN: 0717168433
  • Category: History
  • Page: 384
  • View: 5511
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Capture the spirit of an industrial, social and cultural revolution through this invigorating collection of historical portraits from the dawn of the industrialised world! Though it feels like an era marooned almost irretrievably in the distant past, the 1840s &ndash’ a decade of blistering social and cultural change – is only two lifetimes removed from the present day. There are, in other words, people alive today who knew and associated with people for whom the Gold Rush and the Great Famine were living memories. Having grown up in an Irish country house built that year, 1847 has long proven the source of inspiration and fascination for historian Turtle Bunbury. And in a bid to once more grasp the spirit of the age, he has over the years assembled an archive of the most remarkable stories from those twelve momentous months. Bristling with all manner of human life and endeavour, from American pioneers and German entrepreneurs to circus charlatans and down-and-out songwriters, 1847 is a collection of his most remarkable discoveries to date and a stirring portrait of a chaotic world surging towards the modern. By turns poignant, outlandish, curious and provocative, this is history at its most invigorating – as panorama, as epic. Praise for The Glorious Madness: ‘An absolutely brilliant book.’ Patrick Geoghegan, Associate Professor in History at Trinity College, Dublin ‘Turtle Bunbury’s open-handed, clear-sighted and finely written book comes fresh and, I might almost say, redeemed out of the moil and storm of controversy that surrounded the topic of the war, in a thousand different guises in the decades since its end. Turtle holds out his hand in the present, seeking the lost hands of the past, in darkness, in darkness, but also suddenly in the clear light of kindness – in the upshot acknowledging their imperilled existence with a brilliant flourish, a veritable banner, of wonderful stories.’ Sebastian Barry, author of The Secret Scripture ‘Turtle continues the wonderful listening and yarn-spinning he has honed in the Vanishing Ireland series, applying it to veterans of the First World War. The stories he recreates are poignant, whimsical and bleakly funny, bringing back into the light the lives of people who found themselves on the wrong side of history after the struggle for Irish independence. This is my kind of micro-history.’ John Grenham, The Irish Times Praise for Vanishing Ireland: ‘A perfect symbiosis between text and images – both similarity affectionate, respectful, humorous, slightly melancholic but never sentimental or nostalgic. This is invaluable social history.’ Cara Magazine ‘This is a beautiful and remarkably simple book that will melt the hardest of hearts. Bunbury has a light writing style that lets his interviewees, elderly folk from around the country, tell their stories without interference. It’s neither patronising nor overly romantic about the past; just narrating moving tales – The portraits by Fennell are striking, warm and dignified, with a feeling of being invited into people’s lives.’The Sunday Times