Search results for: writing-about-dance

Writing about Dance

Author : Wendy R. Oliver
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Writing about Dance

Author : Wendy Oliver
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This comprehensive guide provides students with instructions for writing about dance in many different contexts. It brings together the many different kinds of writing that can be effectively used in a variety of dance classes from technique to appreciation.

Writing the Dance

Author : Richard Kent
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Published in cooperation with the National Writing Project, "Writing the Dance" provides dancers and dance students of all abilities with an opportunity to immerse, think broadly, and connect deeply to the inner life of the dancer. Within this book you'll find a wide variety of reflective activities that can optimize a dancer's performance, including prompts and analysis pages for classes, rehearsals, and performances. This workbook-journal allows dancers to come to know their work in the studio and on stage in a more intimate and detailed way.

Writing Dancing in the Age of Postmodernism

Author : Sally Banes
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A leading critic traces three decades of contemporary dance from Balanchine to breakdancing

Write Dance in the Early Years

Author : Ragnhild Oussoren
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Dancing in the Millennium Conference 2000 Washington D C

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Dance Education

Author : Andrew Schlegelmilch
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Writing about traumatic or stressful experiences has been shown to have physical and mental health benefits. This book describes two studies that were designed to test the hypothesis that programmed writing would enhance the mood, health, and dance skill of students enrolled in dance education classes. Study 1 included 40 participants with a mean age of 17.1 years who were enrolled in a community-based summer dance camp. Study 2 included 100 participants with a mean age of 20.5 years who were enrolled in university-based dance education classes. Both studies utilized a pre/post design, and participants were randomly assigned to a programmed writing group or a control writing group. The programmed writing group was instructed to write about their thoughts and feelings about dance, and the control writing group was instructed to write about what they learned in class that day. Participants also completed questionnaires about their mood, health, and perceived dance skill, and were rated by independent observers on dance skill and attitude. A series of multivariate analyses of variance (MANOVA) examined the effects of programmed writing on mood, health and dance skill. The results of Study 1 suggested that programmed writing had a positive effect on mood, but failed to have a significant effect on health or dance skill. The results for Study 2 suggested that programmed writing did not have a significant effect on health, mood, or dance skill. These studies appear to be an appropriate application of programmed writing in an applied setting, and call into question the ability of programmed writing to effectively cause positive changes in health, mood, and goal attainment, as is typically reported in the literature. Ideas for future research such as linguistic analysis of participants' journals and further clarification of the role of stress and emotionality in dance are discussed.

Dance Scope

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Dance Theory

Author : Tilden Russell
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"This book began in 2014 as an introduction to the book I was then writing about a small group of dance theorists-five Germans and an Englishman-and their treatises published between 1703 and 1721: obviously a very narrow conspectus in subject and years. The aim of the introduction was to place these largely ignored writers (epecially the Germans) in a broad historical context that would demonstrate how essential and pivotal they were. As I read further in dance theory I found more and more sources on the subject that turned out to be far more interesting and complex than I had originally imagined. The introduction kept getting longer, until it became an albatross on the book's actual text, not only because of its ever-increasing length, but more gravely, because I had assumed it would trace a teleological ascent in dance theory culminating in my authors and their works, followed by a degenerative aftermath. This tendentious viewpoint threatened not only to deter readers from a sympathetic reading of the book as a whole; it turned out, the more I read and learned, to be simply wrong. The history of dance theory, as I gradually came to realize, is too interesting and important to be exploited for spurious purposes. Also, it's an untold story. Dance historians are familiar with many or most of the authors and titles, but not what they have to say about dance theory. That's the part usually at the beginning of books that is skimmed through in order to get to the more urgent preoccupations of historical dancers and dance historians: performance practice, reconstruction, technique, and repertoire. Viewed superficially, moreover, it can seem as if the same self-evident and obligatory themes keep getting repeated like clichés in these sections under the general rubric of theory: a definition of dance and/or dance theory, or at least a list of their basic components; the relation of dance to the other arts and other areas of knowledge; dance's origin and history; and its utility (i.e., health, social conduct and success, recreation). Finally, and contrary to what I had long believed, dance theory is not dead. In fact, it is thriving in the twenty-first century. Yes, I was fully aware that something called dance theory was being copiously written and talked about, and that "theory" and "theorizing" and "theorist" had become wildly ubiquitous in dance scholars' lexicon, but I believed that what they were talking about was no genuine dance theory, had no kinship with what was historically accepted as dance theory, and did not meet the criteria of what a theory should be. I was convinced that what I considered dance theory had been swept away in the iconoclastic, irreverent, and nonconformist spirit of postmodernism. Luckily, early readers tactfully convinced me to address my folly. As I wrote, I learned. Writing this book has already served as a textbook in my own learning experience. There are some excellent compilations of readings in dance history. The common format is to devote each chapter to a historical period, with an introductory essay followed by relevant readings. The number of readings tends to increase as history marches on, peaking in the nineteenth century. A sampling of such compilations follows. Each book differs from this one in different ways, but in general, and by intent, none of them does everything this book sets out to do: treat theory in depth and as a discrete topic; treat theatrical and social dance equally; include readings dating from classical Antiquity to the twenty-first century; and link the readings, through brief introductory essays, from end to end by a narrative thread based on salient topics as seen from evolving perspectives"--

History of Brophy Mills Schmor Gerking Brophy LLP

Author :
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New Performance

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Dancing Jewish

Author : Rebecca Rossen
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While Jews are commonly referred to as the "people of the book," American Jewish choreographers have consistently turned to dance as a means to articulate personal and collective identities; tangle with stereotypes; advance social and political agendas; and imagine new possibilities for themselves as individuals, artists, and Jews. Dancing Jewish delineates this rich history, demonstrating that Jewish choreographers have not only been vital contributors to American modern and postmodern dance, but that they have also played a critical and unacknowledged role in the history of Jews in the United States. By examining the role dance has played in the struggle between Jewish identification and integration into American life, the book moves across disciplinary boundaries to show how cultural identity, nationality, ethnicity, and gender are formed and performed through the body and its motions. A dancer and choreographer, as well as an historian, Rebecca Rossen offers evocative analyses of dances while asserting the importance of embodied methodologies to academic research. Featuring over fifty images, a companion website, and key works from 1930 to 2005 by a wide range of artists-including David Dorfman, Dan Froot, David Gordon, Hadassah, Margaret Jenkins, Pauline Koner, Dvora Lapson, Liz Lerman, Sophie Maslow, Anna Sokolow, and Benjamin Zemach-Dancing Jewish offers a comprehensive framework for interpreting performance and establishes dance as a crucial site in which American Jews have grappled with cultural belonging, personal and collective histories, and the values that bind and pull them apart.

Salome and the Dance of Writing

Author : Françoise Meltzer
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How does literature imagine its own powers of representation? Françoise Meltzer attempts to answer this question by looking at how the portrait—the painted portrait, framed—appears in various literary texts. Alien to the verbal system of the text yet mimetic of the gesture of writing, the textual portrait becomes a telling measure of literature's views on itself, on the politics of representation, and on the power of writing. Meltzer's readings of textual portraits—in the Gospel writers and Huysmans, Virgil and Stendhal, the Old Testament and Apuleius, Hawthorne and Poe, Kafka and Rousseau, Walter Scott and Mme de Lafayette—reveal an interplay of control and subversion: writing attempts to veil the visual and to erase the sensual in favor of "meaning," while portraiture, with its claims to bringing the natural object to "life," resists and eludes such control. Meltzer shows how this tension is indicative of a politics of repression and subversion intrinsic to the very act of representation. Throughout, she raises and illuminates fascinating issues: about the relation of flattery to caricature, the nature of the uncanny, the relation of representation to memory and history, the narcissistic character of representation, and the interdependency of representation and power. Writing, thinking, speaking, dreaming, acting—the extent to which these are all controlled by representation must, Meltzer concludes, become "consciously unconscious." In the textual portrait, she locates the moment when this essential process is both revealed and repressed.

Rules for the Dance

Author : Mary Oliver
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An introduction to the sound, rhyme, meter, and scansion of metrical poetry with examples from the Elizabethan Age to Elizabeth Bishop

Anarchic Dance

Author : Liz Aggiss
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Liz Aggiss and Billy Cowie, known collectively as Divas Dance Theatre, are renowned for their highly visual, interdisciplinary brand of dance performance that incorporates elements of theatre, film, opera, poetry and vaudevillian humour. Anarchic Dance, consisting of a book and DVD-Rom, is a visual and textual record of their boundary-shattering performance work. The DVD-Rom features extracts from Aggiss and Cowie's work, including the highly-acclaimed dance film Motion Control (premiered on BBC2 in 2002), rare video footage of their punk-comic live performances as The Wild Wigglers and reconstructions of Aggiss's solo performance in Grotesque Dancer. These films are cross-referenced in the book, allowing readers to match performance and commentary as Aggiss and Cowie invite a broad range of writers to examine their live performance and dance screen practice through analysis, theory, discussion and personal response. Extensively illustrated with black and white and colour photographs Anarchic Dance, provides a comprehensive investigation into Cowie and Aggiss’s collaborative partnership and demonstrates a range of exciting approaches through which dance performance can be engaged critically.

Dancing Mosaic

Author : Mohd. Anis Md. Nor
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Writing Analytically

Author : David Rosenwasser
File Size : 88.29 MB
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The popular, brief rhetoric that treats writing as thinking, WRITING ANALYTICALLY offers a sequence of specific prompts that teach students across the curriculum how the process of analysis and synthesis is a vehicle for original and well-developed ideas.

Salome and the Dance of Writing

Author : Françoise Meltzer
File Size : 51.78 MB
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How does literature imagine its own powers of representation? Françoise Meltzer attempts to answer this question by looking at how the portrait—the painted portrait, framed—appears in various literary texts. Alien to the verbal system of the text yet mimetic of the gesture of writing, the textual portrait becomes a telling measure of literature's views on itself, on the politics of representation, and on the power of writing. Meltzer's readings of textual portraits—in the Gospel writers and Huysmans, Virgil and Stendhal, the Old Testament and Apuleius, Hawthorne and Poe, Kafka and Rousseau, Walter Scott and Mme de Lafayette—reveal an interplay of control and subversion: writing attempts to veil the visual and to erase the sensual in favor of "meaning," while portraiture, with its claims to bringing the natural object to "life," resists and eludes such control. Meltzer shows how this tension is indicative of a politics of repression and subversion intrinsic to the very act of representation. Throughout, she raises and illuminates fascinating issues: about the relation of flattery to caricature, the nature of the uncanny, the relation of representation to memory and history, the narcissistic character of representation, and the interdependency of representation and power. Writing, thinking, speaking, dreaming, acting—the extent to which these are all controlled by representation must, Meltzer concludes, become "consciously unconscious." In the textual portrait, she locates the moment when this essential process is both revealed and repressed.

Writing as a Curriculum Component in Dance Education and Dance Programming

Author : Andrew J. Schlegelmilch
File Size : 88.60 MB
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Writing about traumatic or stressful experiences has been shown to have physical and mental health benefits. Two studies were designed to test the hypothesis that programmed writing would enhance the mood, health, and dance skill of students enrolled in dance education classes. Study 1 included 40 participants with a mean age of 17.1 years who were enrolled in a community-based summer dance camp. Study 2 included 100 participants with a mean age of 20.5 years who were enrolled in university-based dance education classes. Both studies utilized a pre/post design, and participants were randomly assigned to a programmed writing group or a control writing group. The programmed writing group was instructed to write about their thoughts and feelings about dance, and the control writing group was instructed to write about what they learned in class that day. Participants also completed questionnaires about their mood, health, and perceived dance skill, and were rated by independent observers on dance skill and attitude. A series of multivariate analyses of variance (MANOVA) examined the effects of programmed writing on mood, health and dance skill. The results of Study 1 suggested that programmed writing had a positive effect on mood, but failed to have a significant effect on health or dance skill. The results for Study 2 suggested that programmed writing did not have a significant effect on health, mood, or dance skill. These studies appear to be an appropriate application of programmed writing in an applied setting, and call into question the ability of programmed writing to effectively cause positive changes in health, mood, and goal attainment, as is typically reported in the literature. Ideas for future research such as linguistic analysis of participants' journals and further clarification of the role of stress and emotionality in dance are discussed.

New Directions in Dance

Author : Diana Theodores Taplin
File Size : 24.3 MB
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