Search results for: writing-machines-mediaworks-pamphlets

The Digital Literary Sphere

Author : Simone Murray
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Drawing on approaches from literary studies, media and cultural studies, book history, cultural policy, and the digital humanities, this book asks: What is the significance of authors communicating directly to readers via social media? How does digital media reframe the “live” author-reader encounter? And does the growing army of reader-reviewers signal an overdue democratizing of literary culture or the atomizing of cultural authority? In exploring these questions, The Digital Literary Sphere takes stock of epochal changes in the book industry while probing books’ and digital media’s complex contemporary coexistence.

Virtual Knowledge

Author : Paul Wouters
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Today we are witnessing dramatic changes in the way scientific and scholarlyknowledge is created, codified, and communicated. This transformation is connected to the use ofdigital technologies and the virtualization of knowledge. In this book, scholars from a range ofdisciplines consider just what, if anything, is new when knowledge is produced in new ways. Doesknowledge itself change when the tools of knowledge acquisition, representation, and distributionbecome digital? Issues of knowledge creation and dissemination go beyond thedevelopment and use of new computational tools. The book, which draws on work from the VirtualKnowledge Studio, brings together research on scientific practice, infrastructure, and technology.Focusing on issues of digital scholarship in the humanities and social sciences, the contributorsdiscuss who can be considered legitimate knowledge creators, the value of "invisible"labor, the role of data visualization in policy making, the visualization of uncertainty, theconceptualization of openness in scholarly communication, data floods in the social sciences, andhow expectations about future research shape research practices. The contributors combine anappreciation of the transformative power of the virtual with a commitment to the empirical study ofpractice and use. The hardcover edition does not include a dust jacket.

Bookishness

Author : Jessica Pressman
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Twenty-first-century culture is obsessed with books. In a time when many voices have joined to predict the death of print, books continue to resurface in new and unexpected ways. From the proliferation of “shelfies” to Jane Austen–themed leggings and from decorative pillows printed with beloved book covers to bookwork sculptures exhibited in prestigious collections, books are everywhere and are not just for reading. Writers have caught up with this trend: many contemporary novels depict books as central characters or fetishize paper and print thematically and formally. In Bookishness, Jessica Pressman examines the new status of the book as object and symbol. She explores the rise of “bookishness” as an identity and an aesthetic strategy that proliferates from store-window décor to experimental writing. Ranging from literature to kitsch objects, stop-motion animation films to book design, Pressman considers the multivalent meanings of books in contemporary culture. Books can represent shelter from—or a weapon against—the dangers of the digital; they can act as memorials and express a sense of loss. Examining the works of writers such as Jonathan Safran Foer, Jennifer Egan, Mark Z. Danielewski, and Leanne Shapton, Pressman illuminates the status of the book as a fetish object and its significance for understanding contemporary fakery. Bringing together media studies, book history, and literary criticism, Bookishness explains how books still give meaning to our lives in a digital age.

New Narratives

Author : Ruth E. Page
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Just as the explosive growth of digital media has led to ever-expanding narrative possibilities and practices, so these new electronic modes of storytelling have, in their own turn, demanded a rapid and radical rethinking of narrative theory. This timely volume takes up the challenge, deeply and broadly considering the relationship between digital technology and narrative theory in the face of the changing landscape of computer-mediated communication. New Narratives reflects the diversity of its subject by bringing together some of the foremost practitioners and theorists of digital narratives. It extends the range of digital subgenres examined by narrative theorists to include forms that have become increasingly prominent, new examples of experimental hypertext, and contemporary video games. The collection also explicitly draws connections between the development of narrative theory, technological innovation, and the use of narratives in particular social and cultural contexts. Finally, New Narratives focuses on how the tools provided by new technologies may be harnessed to provide new ways of both producing and theorizing narrative. Truly interdisciplinary, the book offers broad coverage of contemporary narrative theory, including frameworks that draw from classical and postclassical narratology, linguistics, and media studies.

Writing Machines

Author : N. Katherine Hayles
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Tracing a journey from the 1950s through the 1990s, N. Katherine Hayles uses theautobiographical persona of Kaye to explore how literature has transformed itself from inscriptionsrendered as the flat durable marks of print to the dynamic images of CRT screens, from verbal textsto the diverse sensory modalities of multimedia works, from books to technotexts.Weaving togetherKaye's pseudo-autobiographical narrative with a theorization of contemporary literature inmedia-specific terms, Hayles examines the ways in which literary texts in every genre and periodmutate as they are reconceived and rewritten for electronic formats. As electronic documents becomemore pervasive, print appears not as the sea in which we swim, transparent because we are soaccustomed to its conventions, but rather as a medium with its own assumptions, specificities, andinscription practices. Hayles explores works that focus on the very inscription technologies thatproduce them, examining three writing machines in depth: Talan Memmott's groundbreaking electronicwork Lexia to Perplexia, Mark Z. Danielewski's cult postprint novel House of Leaves, and TomPhillips's artist's book A Humument. Hayles concludes by speculating on how technotexts affect thedevelopment of contemporary subjectivity.Writing Machines is the second volume in the MediaworkPamphlets series.

Rhetorical Delivery as Technological Discourse

Author : Ben McCorkle
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According to Ben McCorkle, the rhetorical canon of delivery—traditionally seen as the aspect of oratory pertaining to vocal tone, inflection, and physical gesture—has undergone a period of renewal within the last few decades to include the array of typefaces, color palettes, graphics, and other design elements used to convey a message to a chosen audience. McCorkle posits that this redefinition, while a noteworthy moment of modern rhetorical theory, is just the latest instance in a historical pattern of interaction between rhetoric and technology. In Rhetorical Delivery as Technological Discourse: A Cross-Historical Study, McCorkle explores the symbiotic relationship between delivery and technologies of writing and communication. Aiming to enhance historical understanding by demonstrating how changes in writing technology have altered our conception of delivery, McCorkle reveals the ways in which oratory and the tools of written expression have directly affected one another throughout the ages. To make his argument, the author examines case studies from significant historical moments in the Western rhetorical tradition. Beginning with the ancient Greeks, McCorkle illustrates how the increasingly literate Greeks developed rhetorical theories intended for oratory that incorporated “writerly” tendencies, diminishing delivery’s once-prime status in the process. Also explored is the near-eradication of rhetorical delivery in the mid-fifteenth century—the period of transition from late manuscript to early print culture—and the implications of the burgeoning print culture during the nineteenth century. McCorkle then investigates the declining interest in delivery as technology designed to replace the human voice and gesture became prominent at the beginning of the 1900s. Situating scholarship on delivery within a broader postmodern structure, he moves on to a discussion of the characteristics of contemporary hypertextual and digital communication and its role in reviving the canon, while also anticipating the future of communication technologies, the likely shifts in attitude toward delivery, and the implications of both on the future of teaching rhetoric. Rhetorical Delivery as Technological Discourse traces a long-view perspective of rhetorical history to present readers a productive reading of the volatile treatment of delivery alongside the parallel history of writing and communication technologies. This rereading will expand knowledge of the canon by not only offering the most thorough treatment of the history of rhetorical delivery available but also inviting conversation about the reciprocal impacts of rhetorical theory and written communication on each other throughout this history.

America History and Life

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Provides historical coverage of the United States and Canada from prehistory to the present. Includes information abstracted from over 2,000 journals published worldwide.

Neural

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American Book Publishing Record

Author :
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Metamedia

Author : Alexander Starre
File Size : 33.73 MB
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Does literature need the book? With electronic texts and reading devices growing increasingly popular, the codex is no longer the default format of fiction. Yet as Alexander Starre shows in Metamedia, American literature has rediscovered the book as an artistic medium after the first e-book hype in the late 1990s. By fusing narrative and design, a number of “bibliographic” writers have created reflexive fictions—metamedia—that invite us to read printed formats in new ways. Their work challenges ingrained theories and beliefs about literary communication and its connections to technology and materiality. Metamedia explores the book as a medium that matters and introduces innovative critical concepts to better grasp its narrative significance. Combining sustained textual analysis with impulses from the fields of book history, media studies, and systems theory, Starre explains the aesthetics and the cultural work of complex material fictions, such as Mark Z.Danielewski’s House of Leaves (2000), Chip Kidd’s The Cheese Monkeys (2001), Salvador Plascencia’s The People of Paper (2005), Reif Larsen’s The Selected Works of T. S. Spivet (2009), and Jonathan Safran Foer’s Tree of Codes (2010). He also broadens his analysis beyond the genre of the novel in an extensive account of the influential literary magazine McSweeney’s Quarterly Concern and its founder, Dave Eggers. For this millennial generation of writers and publishers, the computer was never a threat to print culture, but a powerful tool to make better books. In careful close readings, Starre puts typefaces, layouts, and cover designs on the map of literary criticism. At the same time, the book steers clear of bibliophile nostalgia and technological euphoria as it follows writers, designers, and publishers in the process of shaping the surprising history of literary bookmaking after digitization.