Search Results for "yorkshire-wolds-way"

The Cleveland Way and the Yorkshire Wolds Way

The Cleveland Way and the Yorkshire Wolds Way

  • Author: Paddy Dillon
  • Publisher: Cicerone Press Limited
  • ISBN: 1783623721
  • Category: Sports & Recreation
  • Page: 192
  • View: 7692
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Guidebook to the Cleveland Way and Yorkshire Wolds Way National Trails, plus the Tabular Hills Walk link route. The guidebook also contains a 1:25,000 scale OS route map booklet of the Cleveland Way. The Cleveland Way National Trail, described in seven day stages, is a fine 177km (110 miles) walk around the North York Moors National Park from Helmsley to Filey. The Yorkshire Wolds Way is one of the quietest of Britain's National Trails and wanders for 130km (80 miles) through gentle, cultivated and sparsely populated countryside. Described here in nine day stages, from Hessle near Redcar to Filey, it links end-to-end with the Cleveland Way on the coast. Also described is the three-day, 80km (50 mile) Tabular Hills Walk, a Regional Trail that allows walkers to close the loop of the Cleveland Way and transform it into an enormous circular walk. The guidebook comes with a separate map booklet of 1:25,000 scale OS maps showing the full route of the Cleveland Way. The clear step-by-step route description links together with the map booklet at each stage along the Way, and the compact format is conveniently sized for slipping into a jacket pocket or the top of a rucksack.

Rambling Man Walks the Yorkshire Wolds Way

Rambling Man Walks the Yorkshire Wolds Way

  • Author: Andrew Bowden
  • Publisher: Rambling Man Books
  • ISBN: N.A
  • Category: Travel
  • Page: N.A
  • View: 6865
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The Yorkshire Wolds Way. A 79 mile walking route that starts near the Humber Bridge, and ends with fish and chips in sight at the Victorian seaside resort of Filey. It's a walk that takes you through a secret part of Yorkshire. One rather overshadowed by those famous Yorkshire Dales, and the North York Moors. Hidden it may be. But it's there. Not very well known. But there. So in the middle of a heatwave, two men left their respective homes, and headed to the town of Hessle, on the Humber Estuary. And they went on a walk. A walk along fields, through enchanting dales, quaint villages and so much more. Although there were quite a lot of fields. This is the important, and extremely true tale of that journey. Of the sights. Of the sounds. Of the conversations about Adrian Chiles. Of the benches. Of the questions. Like, just what is a wold, anyway? Includes a guide to planning your own walk on the Yorkshire Wolds Way National Trail.

Walking the Wolds Way: Yorkshire on Foot from Hull to Filey

Walking the Wolds Way: Yorkshire on Foot from Hull to Filey

  • Author: David Clensy
  • Publisher: Lulu.com
  • ISBN: 1430310197
  • Category:
  • Page: 86
  • View: 9799
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David Clensy had never walked further than his car door when he decided to take on the 80 miles of the Yorkshire Wolds Way. Join him as he steps out on the trek from Hull to Filey. Whether you're planning to walk the Way or just fancy a chuckle at someone else's misfortunes, you are sure to be engrossed in the journey.

Yorkshire Wolds Way

Yorkshire Wolds Way

  • Author: Roger Ratcliffe
  • Publisher: Aurum Press
  • ISBN: 9781845136437
  • Category: Walking
  • Page: 144
  • View: 8934
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The Yorkshire Wolds Way runs for the 79 miles (127km) over the gently rolling chalk hills between Hessle Haven and the Cliffs above Filey. Beginning by the Humber estuary, you can follow the countryside agency’s acorn waymarks through wooded slopes and valleys, past the deserted medieval village of Wharram Percy to the geological curiosity of Filey Brigg. This Official National Trail Guide, published in association with Natural England, the countryside agency who administer England's fifteen official long-distance footpaths, is the perfect companion for the dedicated walker and the weekend stroller.

Yorkshire Wolds Way Adventure Atlas

Yorkshire Wolds Way Adventure Atlas

  • Author: A-Z Map Company Staff
  • Publisher: Adventure
  • ISBN: 9781782571940
  • Category:
  • Page: 44
  • View: 8955
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Walking the County High Points of England

Walking the County High Points of England

  • Author: David Bathurst
  • Publisher: Summersdale Publishers LTD - ROW
  • ISBN: 0857657542
  • Category: Travel
  • Page: 288
  • View: 2856
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From Dark Peak on the Pennine Way in Derbyshire to the misty Malverns in Worcestershire and Milk Hill on the Mid-Wilts Way, walking the county high points provides the perfect opportunity for ramblers to experience the English countryside. An indefatigable walker, David Bathurst has unlaced his boots to produce this unique companion to the country’s most rewarding hilltop trails. His appreciation of the beauty and history of the British countryside and his light-hearted style will appeal to experienced and novice walkers alike.

Scotland's Mountain Ridges

Scotland's Mountain Ridges

Scrambling, Mountaineering and Climbing - the best routes for summer and winter

  • Author: Dan Bailey
  • Publisher: Cicerone Press Limited
  • ISBN: 1849654344
  • Category: Sports & Recreation
  • Page: 256
  • View: 8909
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A guidebook to the rich mix of summer scrambling, rock climbing and winter mountaineering on Scotland's ridges, from the remote Cairngorms to the splendour of the Cuillin. Graceful carved walkways slung between summits, twisted spines of stone - ridges can be the most beautiful of mountain landforms. With elegant lines and giddy exposure, ridge climbs emit a powerful siren call, drawing us out onto the rocks. Life on the edge has a special quality, born of the contrast of empty space all around, and intricate detail in close-up. The crests are strangely irresistible. Scotland's ridges are among the finest mountaineering lines in the country, every one a unique adventure. The variety of these routes reflects the breadth of the mountain experience: a rich mix of summer scrambles, technical rock and challenging winter climbs. This book covers both the popular classics and some obscure gems, aiming to celebrate these thrilling climbs as much as to document them. Along the way it explores landscapes of magnificent diversity, ranging from the remote desolation of the Cairngorms to the seaside splendour of the Cuillin, the great trench of Glencoe to the surreal exhibitionism of the far north. The chosen selection spans the grade range, with routes to suit all levels of ability. Whether an earthbound hillwalker or an accomplished climber, Scotland's ridges cannot fail to stir your imagination.

Walks in Silverdale and Arnside

Walks in Silverdale and Arnside

21 easy walks exploring the AONB

  • Author: Brian Evans
  • Publisher: Cicerone Press Limited
  • ISBN: 184965543X
  • Category: Sports & Recreation
  • Page: 160
  • View: 8394
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A walking guide to the Silverdale and Arnside Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB), at the top of Morecambe Bay in Cumbria and Lancashire, overlooking the Lake District. 21 day walks are described between Carnforth, Holme, Milnthorpe and Arnside, climbing wooded hills and limestone escarpments with views of the Lake District fells. Walks are between 2 and 8 miles in length and visit nature reserves including Leighton Moss RSPB reserve, follow the canal and explore the shoreline. Summits include Wharton Crag, Arnside Knott, Farleton Knott and Hutton Roof Crags. The combinations of rocky coastal scenery, woodland and rough limestone hills either side of the M6 in north Lancashire, make this a paradise for walkers. Routes can easily be linked into longer walks and the extensive network of well walked paths enables walks to be shortened or lengthened at will. The area is renowned for its flora and fauna, its historic buildings and interesting geological features.

Unjustifiable Risk?

Unjustifiable Risk?

The Story of British Climbing

  • Author: Simon Thompson
  • Publisher: Cicerone Press Limited
  • ISBN: 1849656991
  • Category: Travel
  • Page: 400
  • View: 4755
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To the impartial observer Britain does not appear to have any mountains. Yet the British invented the sport of mountain climbing and for two periods in history British climbers led the world in the pursuit of this beautiful and dangerous obsession. Unjustifiable Risk is the story of the social, economic and cultural conditions that gave rise to the sport, and the achievements and motives of the scientists and poets, parsons and anarchists, villains and judges, ascetics and drunks that have shaped its development over the past two hundred years. The history of climbing inevitably reflects the wider changes that have occurred in British society, including class, gender, nationalism and war, but the sport has also contributed to changing social attitudes to nature and beauty, heroism and death. Over the years, increasing wealth, leisure and mobility have gradually transformed climbing from an activity undertaken by an eccentric and privileged minority into a sub-division of the leisure and tourist industry, while competition, improved technology and information, and increasing specialisation have helped to create climbs of unimaginable difficulty at the leading edge of the sport. But while much has changed, even more has remained the same. Today's climbers would be instantly recognisable to their Victorian predecessors, with their desire to escape from the crowded complexity of urban society and willingness to take "unjustifiable" risk in pursuit of beauty, adventure and self-fulfilment. Unjustifiable Risk was shortlisted for the Boardman Tasker prize in 2011.